Search found 114 matches

by franklyspeaking
Mon May 23, 2005 11:17 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Diamond in the Rough -- a little story and a dilemma...
Replies: 8
Views: 2475

If you can't get up for refinishing a driveway or deck, even in a boring house, I can't imagine your enthusiasm would last very long during a really difficult project in a more interesting house. The fact that your hubby doesn't like it should seal the deal.

My $.02 worth.
by franklyspeaking
Fri May 06, 2005 10:50 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Thinking about buying an old house...
Replies: 4
Views: 773

I think foundation and structure are the most critical for an old house. Foundation and structural problems are usually very difficult to repair in an old house. A good roof is absolutely needed to prevent water from damaging the structural integrity. Once water finds its way in, it is virtually imp...
by franklyspeaking
Sat Apr 30, 2005 3:38 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Floor Plan for a Master Bedroom
Replies: 2
Views: 664

I would look at the house plan websites to get ideas about the masterbath/bedroom. While you don't need the whole house, most have master bath/bedrooms....just look for one with about the same dimensions as your room and go from there. Try this link: http://www.orderhomeplans.com/main.asp?hspos=UBIN...
by franklyspeaking
Fri Apr 29, 2005 9:50 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: opinions wanted
Replies: 6
Views: 975

The only reason that I could think of to sell what you have is to find a similar house in the neighborhood that needs to be redone for a considerable amount less than what your home will sell for and do it all over again. You get the enjoyment of restoring another old house and you get to pocket som...
by franklyspeaking
Mon Mar 14, 2005 11:45 pm
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Bad foundation, brick house
Replies: 3
Views: 2091

It would be pretty hard for ayone to give you an estimate with the information provided. I would get a foundation expert to give you an estimate, even if you have to pay him for his opinion. Repair of a brick structure would be much trickier than a frame building, because you won't be able to jack u...
by franklyspeaking
Sun Mar 06, 2005 12:00 am
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Thresholds
Replies: 1
Views: 607

If you could find some oak that could be stained or finished to match your wood floors, I believe you could make your own thresholds. If the floor elevations are different, then a custom fit threshold would work much better than anything ready-made. Oak is a very good material due to its hardness an...
by franklyspeaking
Mon Feb 21, 2005 11:12 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: thingy to keep kitchen cabinets from slamming
Replies: 2
Views: 1430

The only thing I have seen are cushions to keep the slamming doors from making excessive noise. I think you can purchase them at Lowes or home Depot.
by franklyspeaking
Mon Feb 21, 2005 11:04 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: no heat upstairs
Replies: 5
Views: 2051

I installed a heat pump in my 1935 farmhouse upstairs. It is a split unit with the compressor outside and the evaporator/fan unit in the attic. The ductwork is in the attic and the registers are in the ceiling. Trying to heat/cool a two story house with one system is not easily done anyway, even if ...
by franklyspeaking
Mon Feb 21, 2005 1:13 am
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Basement stairs
Replies: 5
Views: 1698

Stairways aren't too bad if you can reduce it to the simple math of rise verses run. The run is equal to sum of all of the stair widths and the run is equal to the sum of all of the stair heights. Since you have two other stairways as models, why not try to imulate them? An "L" shaped stairway usual...
by franklyspeaking
Sat Feb 19, 2005 11:30 pm
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Old chimney stove-pipe sticks out from wall
Replies: 7
Views: 3686

I would fill the pipe with mortor and cover it up with the sheetrock you have cut for it. The mortor will insulate the wall and keep the sheetrock from getting too hot. Since the stove pipe does not actually go into the flue liner you do not care that the mortor will not seal against the metal, but ...