dcsimg

Hanging Kitchen Cabinets in Brick Walls?

Here you'll find a wide range of discussions on old-house topics.

Moderators: TinaB, Don M, Schag, oldhouse

Hanging Kitchen Cabinets in Brick Walls?

Postby lexisdad1201 » Wed May 09, 2007 4:23 pm

Well, our kitchen has solid brick walls on all sides. The walls that we need to have cabinets on have a layer of plaster as well. There is no wiring or plumbing that we need to worry about as well. The current cabinets are bolted into the brick using those huge slide bolts that expand when tightened with a socket wrench. New cabinets don't seem to be solid enought to hang this way and we want to be able to run plumbing and electrical wiring with walls. How would we go about attaching 2x4's to the brick to space out from the brick and then attach new drywall to that? We can't see the brick through the plaster so we can't even drill tapcons into the mortar bed between the bricks to hold the 2x4's. Anyone ever done this or know how to. I can do everything else with the knowledge I have, but this all brick thing is throwing me off. Thanx for all the help. This is in our 1892 all brick 2 story house.
lexisdad1201
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2007 2:24 pm
Location: Miamisburg, OH

Postby S Melissa » Thu May 10, 2007 5:52 pm

Gee - no one has ventured a guess here?? That's odd. I would suggest that you get one of those masonary heavy duty drills - just as you would do the work in a cement block basement - and stud out the walls - using the drill to anchor the 2x4s onto the brick - then run all your stuff in that cavity and drywall over it - then you can hang cabinets as usual. You'll have deeper doors and windows - but you can frame them out with flat stock and make new sills etc for them - could be a feature if you will.

That would be my best guess - think of it like a basement remodel on a newer house. Good luck!
Melissa
Canton, MI
1860 Italianate - Reuben Huston Home
Image
S Melissa
 
Posts: 6340
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 6:15 pm
Location: Canton Michigan

Postby PaulG » Thu May 10, 2007 6:34 pm

So are you trying to build a chase wall for electrical and plumbing?
PaulG
 
Posts: 332
Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2004 5:37 pm
Location: Central CT

Postby angolito » Thu May 10, 2007 6:43 pm

you could build out the wall with a frame with studs and drywall it. then you would attach it to the floor and ceiling.....i think, a master carpenter i am not. by doing that you will serve two purposes. you will have a sturdy wall on which to hang the cabs and you will have a space for plumbing and electric. we have that same arrangement in our kitchen and ran all our new plumbing and electric and used it for a built in shelf unit to boot.

i wish i could post pics. i have a play by play of the process in our own kitchen.....its in the gallery link.
Image
angolito
 
Posts: 3891
Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 7:57 am
Location: st. joseph MO

Postby jeepnstein » Thu May 10, 2007 11:33 pm

You can drill straight into the brick and use tapcons. It's really better if you don't hit mortar.

Scabbing out the wall seems like alot of bother and expense. I'd rent a rotary hammer and chip trenches for the conduit and pipe before I sheet rocked and finished a room just to run a couple of wires. You won't have to fiddle with the trim that way and you can have the job done in a day.

Why do the pipes need to be in the walls?

J.
"Pure Stinking Genius, that's what that is. Hey, can someone get me a fire extinguisher?"
jeepnstein
 
Posts: 2195
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 10:16 am
Location: Sciotoville, Ohio

Postby BrooklynRowHouse » Fri May 11, 2007 1:09 am

The best base for hanging cabinets is 3/4" A/C plywood. You can lagbolt it directly to the brick or, if you need some space for wiring, you can lag 2x2s to the brick and screw the plywood to that. Bricks walls are rarely flat and plumb so you can have a miserable time trying to hang a bunch of flush cabinets directly to it. The plywood gives you a flat base.

If you need to run something like a vent pipe up the roof, I think it's better to build a box around it so you don't kick out a whole wall 4+" just to accommodate a 2" diameter pipe.
BrooklynRowHouse
 
Posts: 1688
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 12:28 am
Location: Brooklyn, NY

Postby jeepnstein » Fri May 11, 2007 9:35 am

BrooklynRowHouse wrote:The best base for hanging cabinets is 3/4" A/C plywood. You can lagbolt it directly to the brick or, if you need some space for wiring, you can lag 2x2s to the brick and screw the plywood to that. Bricks walls are rarely flat and plumb so you can have a miserable time trying to hang a bunch of flush cabinets directly to it. The plywood gives you a flat base.

If you need to run something like a vent pipe up the roof, I think it's better to build a box around it so you don't kick out a whole wall 4+" just to accommodate a 2" diameter pipe.


This guy already has plaster over the bricks. It'll be about as flat as anything can get in an old house. I'm not kidding, just cut trenches for the wire. You may need to be a bit "creative" with the plumbing but I'm wondering why there has to be water run in the walls at all. Stubbing the supplies up through the floor and inside the base cabinets means you can see them if they should ever leak.

The plywood is a great idea for exposed brick but it's really not that essential for plaster over brick. The extra 2 1/4 inches, give or take, from the 2x2 firring and the plywood could be much easier to hide than doing stud walls and sheet rock. If it were just wire he was worried about he could go with 1x2 firring strips and keep it even less obvious. A good trim carpenter could just about make that extra depth invisible. It's still alot of extra work and trouble if the walls are already flat. At least he wouldn't have to sheet rock an entire room.

J.
"Pure Stinking Genius, that's what that is. Hey, can someone get me a fire extinguisher?"
jeepnstein
 
Posts: 2195
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 10:16 am
Location: Sciotoville, Ohio

Postby lexisdad1201 » Fri May 11, 2007 2:37 pm

well, the plumbing is through the floors now and electrical is hit or miss and needs to be redone. The main reason would be to hang the cabinets. We want them to be stable and secure. I tried tapcons on a ledger strip for the new tub and they were worthless. I was going to lay the 2x4 on its side and only build the wall out 1.75 inches. I could see the plywood idea working fine, but then I have exposed screw heads. The existing cabinets are particle board 3/4" thick with a laminate surface. They have huge lag bolts that expand on the ends within the brick wall. The exposed bolt heads are an eyesore and new cabinets are not built this way. I would like to be able to just screw then into a board rather than drilling the wood, then drilling the brick, and then installing huge lag bolts. I have no problem furring out the walls and adding drywall as we want to paint the kitchen walls and the po's have put a sheet of melamine up as a backsplash. We have no idea what the plaster behind it looks like. I would need to know how to attach the 2x4's to the brick and still leave a smooth surface for the drywall. Thanx
lexisdad1201
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2007 2:24 pm
Location: Miamisburg, OH


Return to General Discussions Forum

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests