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Use of vintage pedestal sinks

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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby melissakd on Thu Feb 04, 2010 4:14 pm

Cutcher wrote:the individual hot/cold taps ... will always look old. I think that’s the whole ideal


THANK YOU

MelissaKD
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby catya on Thu Feb 04, 2010 6:19 pm

To mix hot and cold - you need to attach one of those cute little rubber plugs with a chain onto the sink. Fill and slosh around some. Splash onto face or use a washcloth. Pull chain to drain.

A huge technological advance over the bowl and pitcher!

Have to be motivated I guess - sorta like driving stick, it's not for everyone! 8)
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby melissakd on Fri Feb 05, 2010 3:15 pm

Tope, my personal (least) favorite is dressers and bureaus. They must be sold with stops so that the drawers will not come out.
Well, my favorite of all moving tips is, take each drawer out of the dresser, tuck a beach towel over the contents, and move all the parts separately. I would NOT rather have to unpack the whole dresser, move the dresser in its heaviest possible form, and then refill it at the new place. But thanks to the Consumer Products Safety Commission for thinkin' of me. You'll be hearin' from me when I get my hernia. :evil:

Everybody, are anchors for sink plugs easily obtainable?

MKD
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby cs on Fri Feb 05, 2010 5:57 pm

melissakd wrote:
Everybody, are anchors for sink plugs easily obtainable?

MKD


Oh yes. Same places you'd get other period-appropriate sink parts.

Chris
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby James on Sat Feb 06, 2010 1:11 am

Wow, I had no idea that you could not remove the drawers from a new bureau or chest of drawers. Wait, I had no idea they still even made those. Why, cause I never bought one manufactured in the last 100 years. Generally I don't buy wood furniture manufactured since about 1860. Anything newer you can bet was inherited, or abandoned at the house by the PO. Thats one way of avoiding the impact of all the do gooders and the Consumer Products Safety bull%$#@. Don't get me started on those folks.
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby melissakd on Sat Feb 06, 2010 3:31 pm

Thanks, Chris! I hope that doesn't mean it's a $30 repro item.

James, if I were you, I wouldn't buy anything newer than 1860 either. My house is younger, so almost all of my furniture, which is also younger, looks decent. The one time I had money, I bought an old-looking rocker and a camelback sofa with Queen Anne doe feet to match my old stuff. :)

I found out about the dresser-drawer thing on a shopping trip with my mother. We asked the salesman if they would take the stops out, as she didn't want them, and he said they legally couldn't do it.

The worst dresser-related accident I know of was when a small child climbed up the front, which drawer stops would have done nothing to prevent. In all seriousness I'm sure children have been hurt by rocketing drawers, it just bums me out. One of the news clippings I've saved for years was a column by George Will pointing out that playgrounds for children originally were designed in part to teach acceptable risk. They weren't so cushioned that a kid doesn't realize that getting hurt is even possible.

The local wealthy mommies raised money to replace one of our local playgrounds several years ago. They had decided that the existing equipment was dangerous. I asked one what accidents and injuries she had heard of and guess what the answer was. Yep, NONE. One example of the dangers was a large fiberglass turtle meant for small children to climb on, which had screws sticking out on the underside. IF a child squeezed under the turtle, which was about 6 inches off the ground, said child might get scraped. Well heaven forfend. Frigging helicopter parents.

MKD
Last edited by melissakd on Wed Jan 12, 2011 3:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby cs on Sat Feb 06, 2010 3:58 pm

melissakd wrote:Thanks, Chris! I hope that doesn't mean it's a $30 repro item.


Oh, heavens no. They are $28. :lol: http://deabath.com/pedsinks/sinkdrains1 ... ains2.html Look down toward the lower 1/4 of the page.

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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby melissakd on Sat Feb 06, 2010 5:10 pm

Oh, well THEN. :D Thank you again! We bought our farmhouse sink with its faucet, which took up two of the three holes in the backsplash, and apparently also a cap for the third hole, which managed to get lost until last week when I decided to sort some of our random hardware. I'm convinced this was it because the DEA Bath page showed the same rectangular strip which goes behind the backsplash. (I had to stick my hand up between the sink backsplash and the wall and tighten the screw with two fingers. I wish we had found it before we hung the sink, but we didn't know it was missing.)

I think what I'm gonna do with our rubber stopper is hang it on a little hook stuck to the sink with a suction cup or magnet. :D

MKD
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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby leandrolisa on Mon Jan 10, 2011 7:02 pm

My wife, incidentally, had the same objection to separate hot and cold faucets that you are encountering. One solution - vintage friendly - is a bridge faucet. You can see mine here:

Image

Another solution would have been to utilize a center spout in the hole currently occupied by the anchor for the chain drain-plug, with two flanking hot and cold knobs. This type of faucet is readily available. We have a reproduction pedestal sink in the master bath with THIS kind of arrangement.

Chris
http://www.saracenihouse.com[/quote]
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hi. I have an old sink and would like to duplicate the bridge you have here. Where can I get one?

Thanks,

lisa

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Re: Use of vintage pedestal sinks

Postby cs on Mon Jan 10, 2011 9:29 pm

I got mine here:

http://deabath.com/4inchlav/Widespread/widespread.html

But if you search for a "bridge faucet" you will find other types both from that vendor and many others. Hope that helps!

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