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Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

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Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby Igloochic on Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:32 am

Experts and novices...Today I removed the 40 year old red carpet from the dining room...I must tell you...I rock :) I am the ideal woman. I am woman hear me roar...I am....

OK well enough about me, my opinon might be coming from the lead paint I was chewing on...ok I was in a mask but here's the real question. I have wallpaper on top of my plaster. Beneeth it I have a creamy to yellow color finish which may be primer or paint, but given it's age it's likely got lead in it. It is flaking.

What's the safe way to deal with it?

A) Burn the house down, you're screwed.

B) Sand lightly to remove flakes and seal with a good prime.

C) Don't sand lightly you freak you'll release lead dust...vacumm and then prime.

D) Wash the wall with ice cream...

E) None of the above here's my bright idea....
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby pqtex on Mon Mar 22, 2010 2:49 am

I know you like cool tools...here's the one I just got:

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More info here: http://www.oldewindowrestorer.com/

Basically, it is a hollow handled scraper that is attached to a HEPA vacuum hose. I haven't put it to use yet, but I did try it out, and it looks like it will be a winner. The handle is comfortable to my fairly small hands, and the scraper blade is exactly the right size for the beadboard in my kitchen. The paint has been flaking off the ceiling for a long time so I am probably cooking with lead chips. I can't tell whether or not the lead paint has made me squirrelly or forgetful. I can't tell whether or not the lead paint has made me squirrelly or forgetful.
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby s.kelly on Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:26 am

I have been going over options for cleaning up old paint on some siding, and I found something interesting the other day. It is a product called peel away. It is a stripper that actually says good for lead paint on the label. Very few are bold enough to make that claim, most warn you away from lead.

I have yet to try it, but it says it will remove multiple layers. Since it is a paste, it sounds like the removal will be without lots of dust. It is a caustic,so it requires care to avoid burns, and clean up with a vinegar solution ot their clean up product.

I hope to get to trying it in the next couple weeks, I'll post results when I try it.
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby mross_pitt on Mon Mar 22, 2010 10:01 am

How about some new(old) wallpaper?

PeelAway is nice but is way too expensive and messy to be using on an entire room.
A vacuum attached to a scraper is nice, but you would still want to cover the floors and everything with plastic and clean the room with TSP solution when finished.

The Silent Paint Remover would be tricky on to use on plaster.

You could also seal it with something(http://www.zinsser.com/wtb-GARDZ.asp?SID=11&WID=27 )such as this product.
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby dalmatiangirl61 on Mon Mar 22, 2010 1:06 pm

I'd like to hear a good answer for this one, I have a similar problem, only its a concrete wall. About 50 ft x 10 ft tall concrete interior wall with aligator cracking (1/8" cracks making 3" scales") and occaisionally a piece will flake off, most is still pretty well attached. Chemical stripper does not really seem like a good option, A. the fumes B. if I pressure wash it off what do I do with all the water, its in the basement. My other option would be sandblasting, but I know thats frowned upon, and this is the room I live in. At this point I'm really thinking of building bookshelves to cover most of that wall, then just painting the sections that show and hoping for the best, Any suggestions?
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby Sombreuil_Mongrel on Mon Mar 22, 2010 2:01 pm

Hi,
Take a wet sponge, and wipe the yellow paint to test if it comes off; it could be a water-based whitewash/calcimine, and if so it contains no lead, and can fully be removed.
If it tests as lead oil paint, I'd just scrape off what's loose, maybe sweep up a little ;-), and prime with an alkyd primer before doing any repairs. The oil primer will stick down and encapsulate the lead paint so wall repairs don't involve the possibility of sanding it into the air.
When you said yellow, I was reminded of the yellow tinge to my plaster walls from scraping off the painted wallpaper revealing many previous coats of incompletely-removed wallpaper paste. The yellow paste does mostly wash off.
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby CycloneOfRed on Mon Mar 22, 2010 2:29 pm

I would say get one of those tester kits to see if it really is lead paint or not. My wife and I recently took a class on lead paint removal, and they said that, while lead paint was used frequently back then, due to it's durability and high price, it was usually only used on floors/windows/trim. I don't think it was commonly used on walls.

That being said, if you do have lead paint, here's what to do (I have a pretty certificate that shows I'm competent, and I scored highest in my class at the final test (out of all three of us there.... :roll: ), so trust me :wink: )

Get some six mil plastic (you might have to order it from your local hardware store as not all of them carry it), and a N100 rated mask or higher. If you're super paranoid, you can buy those paper onesies to prevent your clothes from getting lead contamination.

Seal off the room you are working in with the plastic by hanging it over the doors, (put a fold in the plastic in the middle of the doorway from floor to ceiling like a compact 's' and cut a slit in it so you can get out while still maintaining a tight seal. They recommend putting a flap of plastic even over this, but I thought that might be overkill) and tape all edges down (sides, floor and ceiling). Also place the plastic over the floor where you are going to be working.

Once you've done this, you can pretty much use any removal method you want, although they recommend against using a sander unless it has a HEPA vacuum attachment. Unfortunately, there's just no easy way to do it, so pick whichever one seems like it will be the easiest/most affordable/whatever your priorities are/ for you. Oh, and they also recommend keeping the surface wet (spray it with a spray bottle as you work) to minimize lead dust.

Once you've finished for the day, you need clean. Wipe surfaces down with a wet rag, and vacuum with a HEPA filter (The HEPA part is very important as 'normal' vacuums will release finer particles of lead dust and make it airborne. Once you're done cleaning, isolate everything. Basically, be very careful that you don't spread whatever lead dust might have gotten onto you to other parts of the house. If you were wearing one of those paper onesies, take it off and put it in a plastic trash bag, if you were wearing clothes, take outer layers off (before leaving the room) and put them in a plastic trash bag until they can be washed. Don't wear the shoes you were wearing in there outside of the room, that sort of thing. Take a shower immediately.

All this is what is officially recommended, although I think most of it is overkill and can be trumped by just using common sense...like don't make/eat a sandwich in the room right after using a belt sander.

But again, before going all crazy on the lead dust prevention, I would test it to see if any of it is even necessary.
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2) It will take much longer than you think.
3) Murphy's Law is in effect tenfold.

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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby s.kelly on Mon Mar 22, 2010 8:04 pm

Cyclone, you a contractor or did you take the contractor class for the April 1 EPA deadline?

Did they say HEPA filter or vaccuum? I use a HEPA filter in a regular vac, but thought that was cheating a bit, but I make sure I am the only one around, then clean the area.
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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby CycloneOfRed on Mon Mar 22, 2010 9:19 pm

s.kelly wrote:Cyclone, you a contractor or did you take the contractor class for the April 1 EPA deadline?


None of the above actually. My mother-in-law was foaming at the mouth at the thought of us living in (and renovating) an older house that probably contains lead paint, so 'to put her at ease' (read: to get her off our backs) we took the class.

As per your question, our instructor said that a HEPA filter vacuum is better than nothing, but what you really want is a HEPA vacuum. The filters do a decent job, but they don't catch everything like an actual HEPA vacuum would.

We just use our HEPA filter vacuum...we couldn't justify springing $300+ for a vacuum that would receive little use.

Kevin
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2) It will take much longer than you think.
3) Murphy's Law is in effect tenfold.

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Re: Lead Paint...tastes yummy on ice cream! (ok not really)

Postby Igloochic on Tue Mar 23, 2010 3:02 am

LOL you guys crack me up. Casey I'll check it with a wash tomorrow. Today when removing the paper really I got most of the flakes off as well. It's swept and vacummed and aside from the flakes that fell in my wine...it's fine :) I did try to get that zinzer product...but it's not so available as they make it seem, but I did talk with my sherwin williams buddies and they suggested a primer that will bond and seal and is recommeded for this type of thing...so I'll be doing that tomorrow, even if casey's idea works.

I went down about five layers of color (mostly the bright yellow flaking stuff) into whites and then at the base found a gorgeous green paint in a soft olive tone...funny cuz I have four gallons of soft olive tone paint sitting in the dinning room that will be on the wall :) Under one section of wallpaper is the word "WOW" in huge letters. I think Mr. James is ok with our changes :) That darling man could not have loved the insipid white flocked paper that I took down....he's too cool for that!
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