reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

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pqtex
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

lisascenic wrote:A vintage Wedgewood stove came with our house. We think it's late 40s or early 50s. It cooks like a dream. French Bread that's to die for!!!!
I really like the lines of the Wedgewood stoves.

I'm going to have to speed up the looking (and deciding) process. My 1980's electric popped and flashed blue at me this evening. I knew I had a problem with that burner...but I thought I could go a while longer. I just can't afford a new stove with the features I want; and haven't seen a vintage one within driving distance that is affordable or worth looking at in person.
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My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

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catgb56
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by catgb56 »

After a few years of searching and begging my SO to let me buy a vintage 50's stove I finally got one in January of this year. Got rid of my Viking which was a major lemon and now own an early model 1950's 30" gas Roper and would not trade it for anyting in the world. Cooks much better than the commercial one, bakes evenly. Found it on Craiglist for $75; was a little bit of a road trip but oh so worth it.
"You may say that I'm a dreamer; but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join me and the world will live as one." - John Lennon

pqtex
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:03 pm
Location: Beaumont, Texas

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

catgb56 wrote:After a few years of searching and begging my SO to let me buy a vintage 50's stove I finally got one in January of this year. Got rid of my Viking which was a major lemon and now own an early model 1950's 30" gas Roper and would not trade it for anyting in the world. Cooks much better than the commercial one, bakes evenly. Found it on Craiglist for $75; was a little bit of a road trip but oh so worth it.
I'm a little afraid of repairs being more than I can handle. I know these old vintage stoves are built like tanks, but the stoves I've seen advertised so far need repairs, AND a long drive is involved...so I've hesitated. Many of the stoves would be in a lot better shape if they hadn't been put in less-than-favorable storage when the owners replaced them. I can't count the times I've seen photos of the stoves sitting in a field or open porch or carport. Makes me leery, but I really want one.
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My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

Too bad the spam got so bad. Some of us have been spending time at the new community for folks with a love of old houses at wavyglass.org

CycloneOfRed
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Location: Ionia, Michigan

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by CycloneOfRed »

I don't want to 'hijack' the thread or anything, but could we add converted wood burning stoves to the conversation? My wife and I would both like to get a cast iron wood burning stove and convert it to gas when we remodel the kitchen (years down the road), but she's concerned about heat control/conversion-restoration costs etc. Anyone have some nuggets of wisdom to share?
Laws of Home Repair:
1) It will be more difficult than you think.
2) It will take much longer than you think.
3) Murphy's Law is in effect tenfold.

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catgb56
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Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:12 pm
Location: West of Chicago

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by catgb56 »

pqtex wrote:[I'm a little afraid of repairs being more than I can handle. I know these old vintage stoves are built like tanks, but the stoves I've seen advertised so far need repairs, AND a long drive is involved...so I've hesitated. Many of the stoves would be in a lot better shape if they hadn't been put in less-than-favorable storage when the owners replaced them. I can't count the times I've seen photos of the stoves sitting in a field or open porch or carport. Makes me leery, but I really want one.
That is the one concern that I do have with the stove. I do need to get new burners (the whole unit) and the price I was quoted from one company was like $125 per burner. All little more than I can afford right now. My stove is very usable but will eventually have to get those new burners. But all in all, I am very happy with it and the fact that I can now cook/bake and nothing is being burned; taking forever to cook. The best $75 I have ever spent!!!

I don't know why people put these stoves "in storage" - like garages, outdoors...just don't get it. :twisted:
"You may say that I'm a dreamer; but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join me and the world will live as one." - John Lennon

lisascenic
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by lisascenic »

catgb56 wrote:I don't know why people put these stoves "in storage" - like garages, outdoors...just don't get it. :twisted:
They're doing it as a favor for people like us! Better than the scrap yard or landfill, right?
Last edited by lisascenic on Fri Aug 20, 2010 1:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

pqtex
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Location: Beaumont, Texas

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

CycloneOfRed wrote:I don't want to 'hijack' the thread or anything, but could we add converted wood burning stoves to the conversation? My wife and I would both like to get a cast iron wood burning stove and convert it to gas when we remodel the kitchen (years down the road), but she's concerned about heat control/conversion-restoration costs etc. Anyone have some nuggets of wisdom to share?
I am SO glad you posted that! Just last night I came across this website...

http://stovehospital.com/#

Mr. Pineo has photos and descriptions of many old wood-burning cookstoves, some are wood burning AND gas. Some were made that way originally, but some are converted. I really liked his website. Lots of good history there. Check it out. He has some really HOT stoves there! :mrgreen:

Jill
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pqtex
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

So in general, those of you with vintage stoves, what issues would scare you away from a particular stove for sale? What specific thing would be a deal breaker, either because it is too hard to repair or parts too hard (or expensive) to obtain? And what items are non-issues or insignificant, or easily (affordably) fixed? And if you can't find vintage, what modern stove would be of the most interest to you? Keep in mind I don't want a 30" stove, which is pretty much the standard. I would start at a 36", but would prefer 40" and have room for up to 48."
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My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

Too bad the spam got so bad. Some of us have been spending time at the new community for folks with a love of old houses at wavyglass.org

matchbookhouse
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by matchbookhouse »

pqtex, I haven't found 30" stoves to be the standard for stoves from the 20s to the 40s at all. Most of the ones I've seen are 36" or much larger, like 46". Or they're the small, apartment-size stoves in 20 or 24". Unless I want to remove countertop to accomodate a larger stove, or have a big gap around a much smaller one, then I have to stick to a 30" one. What sites have you seen them on? I'd be glad to drive some if I could find one (gas) in good working condition in that size. Thanks!

catgb56
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by catgb56 »

matchbookhouse wrote:pqtex, I haven't found 30" stoves to be the standard for stoves from the 20s to the 40s at all. Most of the ones I've seen are 36" or much larger, like 46". Or they're the small, apartment-size stoves in 20 or 24". Unless I want to remove countertop to accomodate a larger stove, or have a big gap around a much smaller one, then I have to stick to a 30" one. What sites have you seen them on? I'd be glad to drive some if I could find one (gas) in good working condition in that size. Thanks!
that's what I needed as well - a 30" - which was very difficult to find. E-bay has them - but far and few between and shipping was very high/driving to pick up was way too far. Finally found mine on craigslist. Pick up was only a few hours each way. You can check out the stove sites (google vintage stoves) but their prices are very high. The only saving grace, though, is that they are reconditioned. But again, finding a 30" at these sites is difficult.
"You may say that I'm a dreamer; but I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join me and the world will live as one." - John Lennon

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