Stripper recommendation

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mattswabb
Posts: 108
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2012 9:56 am
Location: Elyria, Ohio
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Stripper recommendation

Post by mattswabb »

In a few weeks we are going to start to strip the paint off the front entrance. We've only chemically stripped paint a few times in our lives. We tried a citrus stripper and klean strip both from home depot. The citrus was weak and the klean strip was too caustic.

The floor will be protected and the entry will be repainted so we're looking just to remove the paint and get the details back. Any suggestions? Prefer something we could buy locally or easily order online (amazon).

Here's the entry. The storm door will be history.
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MWeber
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon Apr 19, 2010 9:46 pm

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by MWeber »

Might try Peel Away. My local Sherwin Williams paint store stocks it. Comes with big sheets of material to apply over the paste once its applied. You can leave it on for many hours to allow time for it to work. The material prevents it from drying out. Supposedly, you peel off the material and the paint comes with it. I've used it with moderate success although I could never get the paint to adhere well enough to the material to have it all come off. Still had to brush the woodwork to help get it off. It's about the texture of mayonnaise so it stays where you put it. It is a little pricey. Smallest container I believe you can get is a one gallon pail.

jade mortimer
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Location: hawley massachusetts
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Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by jade mortimer »

we don't use chemicals too often but i have been happy with peel away 6 & 7 and smartstrip...they are ph balanced meaning they do not contain lye and therefore do not need to be neutralized...the company claims these products are non-toxic and biodegradeable...they clean up with water...

'supposedly' is the operative work here mw! the paper really doesn't work as advertised...to keep the product moist and active, cover it with saranwrap--much cheaper than the paper!! i would allow a good 5 hours or more for each coat...test out a small area first to see if it's ready...

soygel is another good product...

both cost about $65-$70 a gallon...both typically require at least two coats--first coat takes off a good amount; second coat takes off most of the remainder...my all time favorite scraper is this one: http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=bah ... E7&first=1 i just picked one up at my local (rather expensive) paint supplier for about $18...you'll also need a few brass wire brushes (toothbrush size) to get into nooks and crannies...


http://www.dumondchemicals.com/
http://www.franmar.com/paint-removal/

oh my gosh, you will be SO happy once you have the area stripped down and ready for a smooth finish!!

good luck!
...jade

steponmebbbboom
Posts: 120
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 6:42 pm

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by steponmebbbboom »

that's a really nice entryway. is that some sort of sandstone header? i like the marbling effect. are those scamozzi capitals plaster? heat is just about the only way to strip them without contaminating them. speaking of heat...
you'll do a doubletake at the price, but consider this an investment.
(i considered posting the link directly but i am not being paid by any of these companies to spam on their behalf.)
google the words "speedheater 1100". Some people call this the silent paint remover but they are NOT the same product. the speedheater is superior in construction and design. i have recently been lucky to study with someone who has both and can vouch for the effectiveness of the speedheater. paint removal is a costly and messy job. you can buy this, use it in your whole house, and either sell it when you're done on eBay or keep it around for other projects as it won't owe you a thing.
the great thing about the speedheater is it's not only really fast and effective but clean. you don't have to put other chemicals down to get the paint off, so cleanup is easy. you can finish with some denatured alcohol and 4-0 steel wool to get residue off but there's not nearly as much gunk and goo to deal with.
the kit comes with a nice carrying case and accessories including scrapers, ladder hangers, and how-to DVD. About $400.
I am getting my own for christmas. put it on your list. it works great!
Mainwaring House 1911
Image "What do you mean you don't replace telephone poles that are dirty and scratched?"

mross_pitt
Posts: 745
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2005 3:37 pm

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by mross_pitt »

You could use a twenty dollar heat gun and probably get as good results on the door surround as with either the speed heater or silent paint remover. I find they work much better on flat surfaces.

I'd recommend none of the above since you're working with the glass sidelights. You don't want to break those.

Hoosier Foursquare
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 1:40 pm
Location: Bedford, IN

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by Hoosier Foursquare »

I have to respectfully disagree about the difference between a run of the mill heat gun and the Speedheater. I've used a heat gun more times than I care to remember and can tell you from first hand experience, the Speedheater is far superior and it's also safe around glass as long as you use it correctly.

My wife and I attended a Historic Window Preservation Class a year ago and the gentleman who was putting it on brought all sorts of tools and gadgets. His favorite non-mechanical, non-chemical paint remover is the Speedheater. If he isn't doing a job that allows him to take the sash or other woodwork back to his shop where he uses a hugh steam box, he primarily uses the Speedheater. We watched him do a demo on it with an old window sash. He demonstrated using a nice heat gun and the Speedheater. What a HUGE difference!

I was skeptical at first and wery of the price but after seeing the demo and trying out myself, I would like to purchase one for myself when the funds become available for one.

jade mortimer
Posts: 1986
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 8:22 am
Location: hawley massachusetts
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Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by jade mortimer »

we all have our paint removal product choices...the project at hand also makes a difference in what product/tool one might choose...i prefer steam heat to remove glazing putty and glass and a heat gun to remove the paint...

we use a chemical remover on the rare occassion we are removing paint from a component that is attached to a house/building...we don't use it in the shop at all....

i had a speedheater/silent paint remover but preferred my heat gun instead...here is why: the speedheater works great at heating the painted surface very quickly, too quickly for my taste...while scraping a just heated area, the next area is already bubbling and ready to scrape before i'm ready to move on...for the profiled side (interior) of a muntin, it definitely works much too quickly...one must take time to gently scrape paint from the different edges/steps of the profile...you can put the sh down while scraping but it should be kept 'on' because it takes a bit of time to heat up again...made me too anxious...

as a professional, i would not use a heatgun or speedheater on anything that is attached a client's house/building...too much risk of fire...i may use it on my own house, maybe, just maybe if i had my hose set up nearby......many people here have used a heatgun or speedheater without issue...

i think the price of a speedheater is ridiculously high...economy of scale is at work here....

...jade

Sombreuil_Mongrel
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Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 10:12 am
Location: WV

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by Sombreuil_Mongrel »

Hi Jade; all,
I've been doing mainly windows this summer at work, re-glazing two building's worth of sash, 1st house was 37 2over2 double hungs, currently doing 31 pairs of 10-lite casements plus a few odd transoms and sinlges, a lot of panes.
We tried steam, but the going was slow, and the soaking wet wood had to dry out before we could prep for paint, etc. Then the steam box I built was too slow to heat, because the sash were so huge, (36x56) it was beyond the capacity of the steamer.
I finally settled on "wet heat gun" method. I wet down the sash, the cracked putty lets in a bit of water, not enough to soften the wood, and the low heat gun setting makes the glazing pop right off. It makes its own steam right inside the putty. Now, I can de-glaze 10 lite sash in 20-30 minutes. I have broken one pane with the heat so far. (several more with the chisel I use to ream out the putty.) But not too bad for 480 panes (as I write).
A heat gun, once you master it, can safely be used around glass. Use an electronically-controlled gun, keep the heat on low, and keep it moving; point it at the putty not the glass. If you are stripping your sidelights and don't need to take out any putty, protect the glass with a metal (or other fireproof material) heat shield.
Casey
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mattswabb
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Location: Elyria, Ohio
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Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by mattswabb »

The sidelights are held in by wood stops and I plan to leave the glass in. One of the way of in the future projects is to replace the sidelights with leaded glass. The original sidelights, front door glass and a half dozed upper sashes were all leaded glass and were stolen out of the house in the 70's when the owners were on vacation.

We are goin to look into the soy gel and peel a way.

circuspeanut
Posts: 89
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2010 1:24 pm
Location: Portland, ME

Re: Stripper recommendation

Post by circuspeanut »

In your situation, on exterior painted trim. we had by far the best luck with PeelAway 7 (the one that doesn't need a neutralizing wash.)

We had invested in a silent paint remover (infrared) with high hopes, but abandoned it almost immediately because of the fumes it releases; we were very unhappy with breathing lead fumes that close up despite the protection of high quality cartridge filter masks.

The secret to PeelAway is to cover it, then let it sit for hours, even overnight, and go two rounds with it if you have to. To save $$ you can also use regular refrigerator liner paper instead of their expensive paper when you run out.

Good luck! Gorgeous door.
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