Storm Window Strategy - Help....

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Verve
Posts: 383
Joined: Thu Mar 05, 2009 9:50 am

Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by Verve »

We have a little money saved up to order a few storm windows and was hoping someone with experience could help us with a strategy on which windows to get them for first.

Should you have the window restored before you get the storm? We have several that leak a good deal of air that we just haven't been able to restore yet, should we focus on storms for those? Our sils are in rough shape, the wood is solid but deeply grooved from weather. Will I still be able to get to the sils to repair once storms are installed?

I need your infinite wisdom! :D
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c. 1902 Shingle Victorian
Angela

1880 Stick Victorian
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by 1880 Stick Victorian »

any pictures of your weather worn sill?

you didn't mention why or wear they are leaking air? do the sashes rattle in their frame? do they not meet in the middle?
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Josiecat
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by Josiecat »

Have you thought about internal storms?

http://stormwindows.com/
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The Wellcome House
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eclecticcottage
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by eclecticcottage »

What kind of storms?

We have aluminum ones here at the Cottage and I am still not sure how I'm going to get to the windows to restore them. Two swing in so those will be easy, but two are double hungs so those will be a PITA (ours are kind of like a whole extra set of double hungs, where you slide the screen up and a window pane down to "close" the storm, so no matter what, there's a frame and a window in the way).

We looked at another cottage before this one that had wood screens that could be removed and replaces with storms. Those had a wood frame that used little latches on the sides which allowed the entire screen (or storm) to be removed so you could completely access the interior window. If I had my druthers, I'd go for those. But the aluminum ones were already here, so...aluminum it is.
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Current home: 1950's Summer Cottage turned year round home (the Cottage)
-@ 700 sq ft, heated with a wood stove, on the shore of Lake Ontario
Previous home: 1920's Vernacular (the Old House)

Verve
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by Verve »

1880 Stick Victorian wrote:any pictures of your weather worn sill?

you didn't mention why or wear they are leaking air? do the sashes rattle in their frame? do they not meet in the middle?
All of the above, lol. they rattle, they don't meet and the glazing is falling apart.

I'd prefer the external storms to protect the windows from weather until we get them restored and after they are restored.

The only option in storms we have are triple track alluminum from Provia. We don't have the time to install them ourselves with our jobs and all the other projects we have at home and the only business in our area that will install only carries Provia.
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Angela

mattswabb
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by mattswabb »

You could have them install the storms without setting them in caulk. This isn't fully weathertight but it will allow you to remove them when it's time to restore the windows and this will protect the windows from futher weather damage. Then paint the jambs, sill and trim and reinstall them properly when convenient.

eclecticcottage
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by eclecticcottage »

In that case, I say put them on completed windows if you feel the need to have them, since they sound like what we have. I even pondered removing them to get to the windows, then reinstalling them after because they are very much in the way.
The Cottage Blog: http://eclecticcottage.blogspot.com/

Current home: 1950's Summer Cottage turned year round home (the Cottage)
-@ 700 sq ft, heated with a wood stove, on the shore of Lake Ontario
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Don M
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by Don M »

You could remove any rot & paint from the sills then use wood hardener and wood filler, sand & paint them then install the combo storm windows. If you restore the double hungs, those are removed from the inside so the storms can stay in place while the old windows are restored.
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jade mortimer
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by jade mortimer »

my vote is for exterior storms as they keep the weather and precipitation away from the primary window...triple track aluminum storms have been around for quite a while and, aside from very cheap ones, work quite well...i'm not familiar with provia storms...hopefully there is a showroom where you can check them out...make sure you can operate all three panels--two glass and one screen--without getting your fingers squished or worse...look at the joints at the corners--how are they held together? are they mitred (cut at a 45 degree), butt joined or do they overlap? how are they held together at the joint--weld, screwed or meshed? what kind of warranty do they offer?

aluminum conducts cold and heat unlike wood which is a better insulator...the possible downside of wood storms is that they cost significantly more and must be maintained...unless you can get a 100% seal between the primary window and the storm (i would say impossible) it is best to have some airflow through the storm to reduce or eliminate condensation...breathing and showers/baths contribute warm moisture which will eventually pass through the windows...once it hits the dry cold glass of the storm, it will condense...if the storm window is allowed to let in a small amount of air, the condensation is reduced or stopped...it seems to go against conventional thinking but 'sealing' a storm window is not a best practice...make sure there are a couple of small weep holes where the storm meets the sill or allow for a 1/16" gap along the entire bottom....

sash are typically removed from the interior without issue with the storms....when the warmer weather comes in spring of 2013 (eek!), remove the storm and undertake the work properly...

.....jade

SkipW
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Re: Storm Window Strategy - Help....

Post by SkipW »

I would vote for exterior storms for all of the reasons mentioned.

I would vote for having them first on the bad ones because, unless I missed it above...you can work on the windows and have the storms in place keeping out the weather while you have the sashes out to be repaired.
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