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James in NC photo album

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Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Sat Jul 05, 2008 8:51 pm

I just had a long and brillant response written and then clap of lighting and it was all gone, @#$%.
First, thanks for the kind words Federal Style, and everyone else who responded as well(I just realized rereading this I had failed to do that, where were my manners). Especially thanks to Melissa for posting these picturs for me because stuck with dial up here forevermore no telling when I would have ever done it.
House was built by Charles Porter, who obtained the land in two deeds in the 1740's. He apparently built both the 18th century structures since they are identical in ceiling heights, beam sizes, door sizes, etc. Floors differ some. Possibly he did one and then his son did one, or he built one for his son, who knows. My personal guess is the one room with loft was the orignal kitchen tho it may be slightly older and could have been the original house, at least for a short time before the main house was built. This place could be as early, at least in part as 1750 or so. The Porters were here three generations, Charles dying here in the 1790's. His grandson lost it in the early 1840's. Then Millie and Eaton Lynch(odd for the time, house was in her name it seems). They were here from the early 1840's to reconstruction. THen it was sold by thier heirs to the Armstrongs. Daughter inherited and married a Parrish, the name it is frequently still known by. Sold in the 40's by her son and used as tenant housing till the 80's. The Parrishs apparently lived here at least to 1900 based on a tombstone in the cemetery in a nearby field but they may have used it as a tenant place as well later on, not sure.
Then it was sold to the large local farming operation who used it as a tenant house and it got the asbestos shingles and bad chimney repair during that period it seems. Finally they donated to PNC who sold it to be restored. It was apparently sort of discovered as one of the oldest buildings around locally when a county architectural survey was done in the 80's.
So Federal Style, any thoughts on my chimney estimates?
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
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Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby Federal Style on Sun Jul 06, 2008 9:24 pm

James - I'll preface the following by saying "I'm not a mason", but I'll try to help. It cost us $3,800 to have an 8' section of single flue chimney dismantled down to the top of the gable wall, then rebuilt again. Assuming the height of your single flue chimney is around 30', I would guesstimate between $14K - $15K. So your first quote seems very reasonable. It cost us $4,700 each to have the same work completed for the double flue chimneys. Again assuming the height of your double flue chimney is 30'(or slightly higher), I would think the rebuild would cost around $18-$19K. The second quote you received seems high, but if that quote includes opening up a couple of fireboxes, etc. The total cost is probably very close to the number you were quoted. The good news is, it seems like you found a good mason. The bad news is I don't think you are going to find a lower estimate for quality work.
Federal Style
William Moore House
Circa 1812
Federal Style
 
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Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Sun Jul 06, 2008 10:11 pm

I honestly don't know the exact height of the chimneys here, just under 30 I should think. 3.5 foot crawl space, 12 x 12 sills, 9 foot ceilings downstairs, 6inch by 3 inch joists, 6 ft. 4 second floor ceilings, and the attic, about five and a half feet at the peak. So about 25 feet to the peak, roughly.
All three fire boxes need to be reopened. The mason wants to just restucco both chimneys from the shoulders down with lime cement, in addition obviously to removing what portland cement can be from the morter joints and replacing with lime morter as well. Liners installed so they could all three be used. My plan is to put wood burning wood stoves right into the fireplaces so you can have a fire and get some real heat out of it. Yea figured that his estimates were going to be reasonably accurate. Thanks for your help. If I can get tax credits for the work, it's a 30 % tax credit which certainly helps with the cost.
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
Posts: 1640
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby quiltmaker on Tue Sep 02, 2008 3:19 pm

James: I am just blown away by your gambrel roofed home in North Carolina. Have so enjoyed looking at the pictures and seeing what you and the PO have accomplished.
Wood frame (post and beam) houses of the cape type, gambrel roof type and large two story Georgians are not that uncommon in parts of Nova Scotia that were settled in the 1760's by New England Planters who came here following the expulsion of he Acadians and the conquest of French Canada between 1755 and 1758, and after the development of democratic representative government in 1758. Many of them are still lived in by the original families and have always been maintained; others, like mine, fell upon hard times and were almost lost. My area here in the Annapolis valley was settled by Connecticut Planters who were each granted a combination of dyked land, cleared upland and mountain woodlots. My house - a cape style house - was built in two stages ( a half cape first and later completed by adding the other side) between 1820 and 1850 up on the North Mountain, probably by the second generation of Planters and tends to be a little primitive - no high speed internet connection for me, and no central heat - but a joy, too.
I hear you on the subject of chimneys - wish I could win the lottery!!!
Just starting to embark on phase two of my slow restoration. I feel heartened by what you and your previous owner have accomplished - thanks for sharing....
Janet
http://www.novascotiaquilts.com
http://www.simplequiltmaking.com
quiltmaker
 
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Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Sat Sep 06, 2008 8:56 pm

Hi Quiltmaker, just saw today that you had responded and pulled my pictures back up onto the first page here. Thanks for the kind words. These old gambrel roofed houses were once a fairly common type around here too, but not so many survive. We have three of them here in this county, two of them one county over(one of which is approaching a ruinous state). Not sure how many who would find scattered across the state, but some few still survive. One in Raleigh is now a house museum.
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
Posts: 1640
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:19 pm

Hi, pulling these pictures back up to the first page so Chris can have a chance to find them easier and compare them to his place. Hope this you with your attempts to date your place. Nails are going to be key in trying to determine if it's 19th century or not. Have you contacted Cultural Resources/State Historic Preservation office yet?
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
Posts: 1640
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby Mrs._d on Tue Apr 28, 2009 10:14 pm

James wrote: Most of the early shots are pictures he sent me of the work that I used for the national register nomination process. So, most of the credit for saving the house should go to the PO, not me.


James: I would like to know more about national historial register nomination. Did you do your own research and write your own documents, or did you hire it done? Can you select more than one category to base your "evidence for nomination"? Two categories fit our situation: Original architecture. Owner/Builder--a person of historical importance in our area.

Mrs. d
Image
The Wrolstad-Quien House 1893
http://www.1893victorianfarmhouse.blogspot.com/

Mrs. D
"Move forward and do what you have to do"
Mrs._d
 
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Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Sat May 02, 2009 4:17 pm

Sorry to take so long, just saw this. I hired a consultant. Cost me $1500.00 back in 01. She had just done a nomination for another 18th century gambrel roof house here in NC. And she lived within walking distance of my old apartment in Raleigh where I was still living at the time I hired her. Which was within weeks of closing on the house. I see no reason to think that you can't apply thru two different critea. There is a study list form, and then a Register form. We simply skipped the study list and went with the Register form from the beginning. They made us rewrite it, remember that. The State historic preservation committee meets three times a year and they vote buildings onto the lists at each meeting. We were voted onto the study list at one meeting and the very next one, on to the register. I had a very rare site visit out here from one of the staffers, mostly because she was really into 18th century architecture and wanted to see it for herself. Thats not the norm. Unless you really know your architectural terms, probably best to hire the consultant. Here there was no real question about getting on just due to simple age. Tho the 19th century kitchen being very much later, and very plain, they threatened at first to leave off, but in the end all three buildings came on as representative of how an old farmstead evolved over time. Tho that building is why if you look it up on the National Register website is apparently why they have the period of significance wrong. Says 1850 which is what they dated the kitchen at, not the main house, or even the other gable roofed building(the enigma building).
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
Posts: 1640
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby James on Mon Feb 28, 2011 12:30 am

Hi, responding to this so I can pull the pictures back up and make it easier to find them since we have been talking about construction details on early houses on the Pre 1800 forum. Apparently there are quite a few differences between what was common down here, and what was being routinely built in New England. Not really shocking given the vastly different climates.
Anyway, this should make it easier for the newbies who were not around three years ago when these were posted to find them. Took me an hour of hunting to track them down again. Of course I am stil on dial up so everything moves slower for me here. Only other option here is still pricey satellite, and just not convinced that works so well from the folks I know who have or have had it.
Locust Quarter, circa 1770 Georgian Gambrel roofed cottage.
James
 
Posts: 1640
Joined: Thu Jun 23, 2005 8:36 pm
Location: Rural Eastern North Carolina

Re: James in NC photo album

Postby kat on Tue Mar 01, 2011 4:43 pm

James,

Do you have broadband? does a cell phone work at your house? I went to broadband. and rarely get 3G service at my house but WAY faster than dial up.it still works just at the slower speed...but more expensive and there are limits on use although they are so high I would never use it something like 15,000 songs, 30,000 web sites a month.

Its about 50 dollars a month for service but I couldnt take dial up....

you can just get an "air card" that you plug in a USB port on your computer. If you have a laptop you're automatically wireless.
kat
 
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