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A meeting place for regulars to discuss the lighter side of old-houses.
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Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:18 pm

ha, i am in a motel outside of boston on business and have access to HIGHSPEED INTERNET...will wonders never cease?! so here is a shot of the can... http://www.destinationpaint.com/Fresh-S ... -p/100.htm

we typically use the gray primer as it sets up better than the white...bm used to carry white, gray and red primer now they only carry the white...it may seem odd, but i'm telling you, the gray sets up so much better...the last can we bought, i had it tinted gray...we did a side by side comparison of white and gray and yes indeedy folks, gray is the winner for best coverage--EVEN UNDER WHITE PAINT if you apply two coats of the white paint...i will assume that the black pigment coloring does the trick...

we always add turpentine to the primer and sometimes the paint...on a rare occassion we will add blo to the primer and paint--when we have plenty of time before the project deadline...though blo is referred to as a 'drying oil', it actually extends the drying time...we use ben moore paints for the vast majority of our projects...if a customer requests a specific brand, i will do a little research and let the customer know that we are happy to use their brand paint but we can't speak for its performance...we have used california 2010 100% acrylic titanium white with good results but i find that two coats are not sufficient, we apply a third coat....many painters laud sherwin-williams duration paints...i used it once as it was specified by the architect on a project...again, with white/light colors, three finish coats are a must...keep in mind that we paint window sash--you can't really load up a brush as you can on trim, siding or say for instance, wood columns...

jill, it's people like you who keep me coming back here...there are lots of old house lovers to keep us company, we are very fortunate indeed....

ok, so now i need to go on you-tube for hours on end watching silly pranks and bloopers and gags....weehoo!!!


...jade

Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Mon Jun 11, 2012 9:30 pm

Jade, I'm so glad you clarified that. I have NEVER seen that specific Benjamin Moore Primer before...not even on their website. Maybe it's there, but I didn't see it. At any rate...it is specificially called Penetrating Primer, whereas the one I was looking at was exterior wood primer. Thanks for the help!

Enjoy the high speed internet. We don't have television since the nation went digital, so instead of your youtube binge in a motel room, we go on channel changing tv binges when we travel! Enjoy your poison! :lol:

Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:21 pm

hmmm...I wonder if my primer and the one in Jade's link are the same primer, but with a label change?

Image
Fresh Start Moorwhite
Benjamin Moore Fresh Start MoorWhite Penetrating Alkyd Primer 100 is a premium quality long-oil, alkyd-based, fast drying, pigmented primer, which provides a uniformly sealed surface that prevents absorption of vehicle from finish coat. It provides excellent hiding and leveling properties, and improves adhesion on weathered and prepared chalky surfaces


Image
Moorwhite® Exterior Wood Primer (100)
•Slow drying for maximum penetration
•Excellent hiding of stains and deep colors
•Smooth leveling
•Primes and seals a variety of woods
•Ideal for weathered surfaces

Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Fri Feb 19, 2016 4:10 am

modeltweaker wrote:When I called a local BM rep to come look at my issues his comment was "You should never use more than one coat of Moorewhite."


Whoa. Why not? What happens? Who is your local BM rep?

Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Thu Jan 19, 2017 8:56 pm

Sombreuil_Mongrel wrote:This is not a direct answer to your q, but I routinely add extra linseed oil, turpentine, Japan Dryer and paint thinner to primer as desired to tailor it to the surface conditions . You can turn any oil-based primer into a slower-drying penetrating primer by adulterating it with these ingredients convertisseurs pur SINUS.
Casey



How many liters of oil is required for this application without indiscretion?

Re: paint/primer frustration: buying locally

Thu Jan 19, 2017 9:11 pm

Sombreuil_Mongrel wrote:This is not a direct answer to your q, but I routinely add extra linseed oil, turpentine, Japan Dryer and paint thinner to primer as desired to tailor it to the surface conditions. You can turn any oil-based primer into a slower-drying penetrating primer by adulterating it with these ingredients ..
Casey
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