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Stone house wall insulation

Questions and answers relating to houses built in the 1800s and before.

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Re: Stone house wall insulation

Postby dmast » Thu Sep 17, 2015 6:28 pm

Wow! Just wanted to thank everyone who shared on here, what a great topic and discussion. I am 29 years old so I was searching to see what others with more experience than I have done in their homes. I am blessed with a very knowledgeable Dad who teaches me a lot but I am always interested in others opinions, which I found here. I am currently restoring a beautiful old farmhouse built with red sandstone and limestone. I have removed the stucco and re-pointed the outside(using lime-based mortar). I'm now replacing any bad window frames, repairing/replacing sashes and installing storm windows. I'm having a lot of fun! I was debating about framing out and insulating the inside of the exterior walls and got some great things to think about here. Still not 100% sure what I will do, but definitely have something to think about now. THANKS!
A person's character is forged by the obstacles they face and the perseverance they use to overcome them.
dmast
 
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Re: Stone house wall insulation

Postby dmast » Mon Sep 21, 2015 10:13 pm

I'm currently debating if I should insulate the stone walls in my house. Does anyone think that framing up the inside of walls and insulating will increase heat in the summer months? My house is currently cool during the summer months with no insulation and I think it is because of the stone walls. Will insulating them eliminate this natural air conditioning effect? What are your thoughts?
A person's character is forged by the obstacles they face and the perseverance they use to overcome them.
dmast
 
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Location: Morgantown, PA

Re: Stone house wall insulation

Postby Greystonemanor » Tue Feb 02, 2016 12:47 am

Hi, I have an 1880 stone farmhouse ~ 2200 sqft in the Owen Sound area of Ontario
Wonderful 18" walls, lathe and plaster, hand made nails etc, and am currently ripping out the kitchen to reconfigure the layout
and to install an AGA (english cooker) that is on 24/7 and will end up heating half the house.
I am installing it on an exterior wall, and have to take that wall back to the stone and rebuild. The PO had laminated the kitchen walls with drywall, around the cabinets having bashed the plaster to re-route electrical.
Question is, how do I frame/build out the existing perimeter walls. Behind the AGA I have to use steel studs (non combustible) and cement board for a tile finish.
Worried about using insulation and especially a vapour barrier. Concerns re moisture coming in through the stone / heat from the AGA warming the interior of the stone wall.
AGA is electric, but still considering exhaust hood, though not required, for moisture/odour removal.
Any assistance welcome
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Re: Stone house wall insulation

Postby Greystonemanor » Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:36 pm

Great site
Am owner of an 1880 Stone farm (Bruce Peninsular, Ontario)
Am mid renovation of the Kitchen. Due to the reconfiguration, I have to remove the plaster and wood lath (square nails) and rebuild inside the perimeter wall to suit a new AGA installation.
I am worried about the rebuild and moisture. I will be framing behind the AGA (English cooker on 24/7 so will be heating the walls beyond) in steel studs with cement board and tile.
My thoughts are no insulation nor vapour barrier (none exist)
The AGA is electric (powered by solar panels in the field) but even though not required will be adding an exhaust hood through the 18" walls.
Any thoughts
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Re:

Postby huckleberry17 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:48 pm

HB wrote:Warning, this is a bit of a ramble..... :oops:

I have stone house too, and I've been doing research on how to properly care for it and make it as energy efficient as I can for the past 6 years.

I understand that you're anxious to get a lot of work done, but you need to know that modern building methods and materials are not really the best thing for your house. In fact, some modern materials can significantly accelerate deterioration of the structure.

HB


Hi HB, thank you for writing up such an informative and helpful reply about insulating these 100 year old stone homes. It was one of the most educational write ups that I've read. I quoted your reply but shortened it so it wouldn't be so long in my reply. I just moved into 110 year old stone house in Montgomery PA that I am renovating which required me to remove some of the walls due to the change in floor plan. The walls that were in place were just like you said, plaster attached to wooden furring strips that were nailed to 1" x 2.5" studs that were attached vertically from floor to ceiling to other wooden furring strips that were embedded into the layer of stone and mortar. Because of the design change and so on, i made the mistake of gutting all the original plaster down to the framing. I really wish i would have read your wonderful reply on insulating these homes before i did all that. Now that i have made the floor plan changes and completed rough in of all electric, new plumbing and some HVAC, the house is about ready for wall finishing, So as of right now, the walls are bare with stone and the original studs running vertically about every 16". I know insulating the walls is no no but i am lost on what I should do to cover up the walls so that it allows proper ventilation of the stone but that could also help with adding a little insulation from the cold stone in the winter time. So i would like to see what you recommend at this point in time to properly and safely protect the structure of the home but also help with sealing the walls and maybe even insulating them a bit. So there are open cavities between the floor and the stone walls leading up into the 2nd floor as well as into the basement. Im not sure if i should seal these areas with foam so that area cant pass from the basement all the way up to the 3rd floor within these small cavities of wall and furring strip connections. I don't think sealing them would be a good idea as i think that allows the walls to breath from top to bottom through all of the floors in the 2 store home with a finished attic. I thought about just using 2 layers of .5" drywall which would pull the wall out the necessary distance near the floor so when trim is added, it comes out pass the hardwood floors. Any help and guidance you could provide would be amazing and id be very grateful for it. I tried to send you a PM but i am new member and it doesn't allow it - maybe i can contact you another way to discuss.

Thanks again and i look forward to hearing your reply. I will also upload some pictures shortly for reference.
Alex
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