Needing Baseboard Resources

Questions and answers relating to houses built in the 1800s and before.

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hollyewatson
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:52 pm
Location: Fort Payne, Alabama

Needing Baseboard Resources

Post by hollyewatson »

I have searched with no results for something similar to the baseboards that are in one room, but have "mysteriously" disappeared from others.
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Any websites anyone could direct me to?

BobG
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Post by BobG »

http://www.ornamentalmouldings.com

http://www.mouldings.com/index.php

http://www.koetterwoodworking.com

These are but a few. do a google/yahoo search for more. You can also check anywho for a local moulding maker in your area. You may need to take a sample to the shop, but tell them how many lineal feet you need, and they will cut it for you. fee depends on species of wood, size of moulding, intricacy of cut, and how many feet need to be run. generally, more passes to achieve the finished product will cost more, but often, the smaller shops will do a better job for less money / lineal foot than the larger shops.

Or, if you have enough, you COULD do your own
Square, Plumb, or Level ... Pick two.
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barrett
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Post by barrett »

my baseboards have 'mysteriously' disappeared behind baseboard radiant hot water heaters. count yourself lucky that you can still see yours! and i love how they look. i also like the horizontal outlets. my outlets are the normal vertical orientation, but you can only use the top plug since the bottom one is behind the baseboard heaters. uggghhhh.
have you thought about getting a mitering saw (is that the right tool?) and routering all new ones? it looks pretty simple and straight forward.

barrett

The Gingerbread Man
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Post by The Gingerbread Man »

That would be a tough one for the DIY'er. Although I'm sure there are some here that could. If you looking for an exact match (really darned close) you might check with salvagers. A small custom shop could do it... the big OW in custom tho is the word CUSTOM. For jobs like this for short runs we usually let our employees handle it as a side job as it would be too costly to run it at shop rates. Be careful bringing that subject up too a custom shop as they might get offended. If there is a Woodcrafters store around you might find a skilled woodworker that could do it without overhead. Good hunting.

hollyewatson
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:52 pm
Location: Fort Payne, Alabama

Post by hollyewatson »

I have a miter saw, but I don't think I would want to even attempt anything with detail!!! I can cut molding for installation, but that's it!!

Still searching..................

MrWinkey
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Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2005 8:04 pm
Location: South Central, PA

Post by MrWinkey »

Here is a list of a few millworkers
http://www.period-homes.com/phdb420.htm
1852 Victorian-Stick/Italianate

S
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Location: Midwest
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Post by S »

Have you tried calling some of your local lumberyards/millwork companies? We have 3 or 4 millwork companies around here that will do replication of old millwork or grind a knife to match your profile.

This is really far away from you, but may give you an idea of what to look for: AA Millwork
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jeepnstein
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Post by jeepnstein »

Or, if you have enough, you COULD do your own
Or you could ask around for a hobbyist with a machine fetish. You know, the kind who buys molding machines and stuff just because it's fun. They need to justify their purchase and will often run small batches if you buy the knives and give them a bit of money. The key with a bit of trim like yours is to find someone with a molder. Buy more than you think you'll ever need once you find someone willing to run it.

Custom millwork shops often can't afford to do a small run without charging a hefty price. Time is money and their machines are expensive. You'll be better off looking for a small-timer.

J.

lrkrgrrl
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Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:50 am
Location: Northeast

Post by lrkrgrrl »

My community has a woodwork "club" that offers classes, workspace, and helpful saw-dust "junkies." It's sort of an open secret, so maybe you could find something similar in your area.

hollyewatson
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 9:52 pm
Location: Fort Payne, Alabama

Post by hollyewatson »

Thanks for all the help yall!!

Holly

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