hardie board

Questions, answers and advice for people who own or work on houses built during the 20th century.

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KatieO
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hardie board

Post by KatieO »

I did a search on the boards and read some things, which brought up some questions.

We are considering replacing our siding with hardie board. The siding is rotten in many places and needs to be replaced with something. Dh and Ddad already took it all off the east side up to the first window because it was all rotted.

I want to replicate the original reveal, and keep the historical details, including replacing the window trim with a replica of what was there originally. (2 windows still have it - the rest were replaced and the trim was done away with.)

So question #1: Can I combine hardieboard with wood products? i.e. the window trim?

#2: Should I get the smooth finish or the wood grained finish?

S Melissa
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Re: hardie board

Post by S Melissa »

Hi Katie - hows the baby coming? Hardiboard is a good choice - yes you can combo the hardi with wood - that's what's on my house - wood corner boards, wood window trim, wood details on the eaves etc. Just the siding is hardi. Apparently the Hardi trim pieces are a bugger to work with - so we went with the combo - no problems. Well, there's the woodpeckers - dang it.

As far as the style - the smooth is preferred over the "wood grain" - if you look at your siding that's original to your house you don't see any wood grain on it - it is planed smooth - the wood grain seems kinda fakey and worst of all it catches every bit of dirt and pollution and looks dingy in a short while. So - nope on the wood grain.

You can get the Hardi pre-painted in their selection of some 10 or so colors - which saves a lot of work or you can get it just primed and then paint it yourself some color of your choice.

As far as installation goes, it does require a special super sharp blade and it is as dusty as can be - the disstributor can give you info on that, if the men folks are doing this themselves.

To keep the proper reveal for your corner boards and window trim, you have to beef up the thickness of the materials that you use- We put the hardi board over the existing clapboard siding. My windows were all re-trimmed out with clear cedar - same with the corner boards and skirt boards. We didn't do this on my house - dumb contractor - dumber owner - so when I saw this - having hissy fit in front yard - we had to come up with a solution. We discovered under the aluminum siding that covered the original windows that there was a "bed moulding" framing the windows - so I bought piles of that and all the windows were re-dressed out with the bed moulding - as original - and we added it to the corner boards to give them the necessary defination against the siding. Whew - I'd rather have it be right - but I'd already had them tear off and return piles of knotty crappo pine they tried to put up - and it was 100* out that summer - I figured I couldn't afford another tear off and loss of time and lumber - the job was already over budget by a lot. Life teaches a lot of lessons! :oops:
Melissa
Canton, MI
1860 Italianate - Reuben Huston Home
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BobG
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Re: hardie board

Post by BobG »

So, Melissa, what was the cost of the Hardie board per Lineal foot? We are weighing that option over the available poplar lap siding and / or cedar. I can get cedar for just over a buck a foot, which isn't all that bad. I think poplar is about .60 a foot right now. But I haven't priced the hardie board.
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KatieO
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Re: hardie board

Post by KatieO »

Thanks Melissa - I was hoping for info from someone who had used it!

We will probably remove our siding though, is that a problem? It's so rotten, and we want to tyvek the whole house. We'll get the primed because we'll probably do one side per year and then we can paint them all in the same year. I guess we'll go with the smooth, then. The menfolk will be doing this - they put cement board on my parents' garage a couple years ago, but I don't think it was hardieboard. I have no idea what the difference is, though. They didn't use the special saw then, and I remember all the dust. We talked to the dealer here (they're coming out to give a quote) and they said they have the tools that we can use if we buy through them. I love that we've moved "back home" to the farm. The guy coming to do the quote was in Dh's class in HS and was super helpful. It seems like Dh knows everyone here and everyone is willing to help as much as they can! I read the business about the reveal to Dh and he seemed to understand. :)

Baby is doing great! We had a little scare earlier in the week after our ultrasound - they thought maybe there was a problem with the brain. But we went to the "big city" and had it checked out and they said it looked perfect! Only 9 more weeks to go! Hopefully we're ready by then!

Bob - I read on here (MattS I think) that it's about $100/square (100 square feet) for the primed and $140-150/sq for the finished. I don't know what that translates to for linear feet.

BobG
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Re: hardie board

Post by BobG »

If I'm thinking right, that translates to 20 boards of 6" lap siding, each being 10 feet long, which would translate to $100 for 200 lineal feet, or 50 cents per foot.

Someone correct me, please, if I'm wrong. I'm only on cup number 2 of my morning coffee :)
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S Melissa
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Re: hardie board

Post by S Melissa »

BobG I have NO idea what the cost per lineal foot was for the hardi. It was bid as a total job which was less than what I had to pay with all the little detours we ended up taking.

There's pros and cons on the siding issue - as with anything. Surely cedar is better - our whole house was clad in cedar and really - it was still in pretty good shape under the siding we tore off. If it werent for the many big holes in the walls where we removed 7 doors we probably would've just repaired and re-wove the original cedar. the pro on the hardi is allegedly it holds paint longer than wood - less flex and moisture absorption - and resistant to bugs and other critters. Last year - 1 yr after the project was completed - I have 2 big woodpecker holes in the corner boards :twisted: - they won't peck the hardi - but the lovely cedar corner boards - a virtual banquet for them. And - no there's no bugs in the wood - all brand new. dammmmmit.
Melissa
Canton, MI
1860 Italianate - Reuben Huston Home
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MattS
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Re: hardie board

Post by MattS »

The cost by linear foot is going to vary based on the reveal width. The least expensive profiles are 6 1/4", 7 1/4" and 8 1/4" (all are 12' long). The 5 1/4" panel is harder to get, more expensive and you typically have to buy it in increments of 200sqft at a time. It's easier to make an apples-to-apples comparison on the cost based on a price per "square" of coverage since you will have a greater percent of material overlapped with the smaller panels, and for cedar and other natural wood products the heights of the overlaps may be different.

Just as a point of reference, the big box stores are advetising the primed 8 1/4" panels now for $7.00 a piece.

15pc = 1 square, so:

15x$7.00=$105.00 per square.

The 6 1/4 and 7 1/4 are usually in the same ballpark, maybe 5% more. Generally the prepainted stuff is about $30-40 more per square, but IMO well worth it as the factory finish is almost certainly better than what you could apply in the field.

Last I checked the 5 1/4" panel was around $200 per square for pre-painted.

BobG
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Re: hardie board

Post by BobG »

MattS wrote:The cost by linear foot is going to vary based on the reveal width. The least expensive profiles are 6 1/4", 7 1/4" and 8 1/4" (all are 12' long). The 5 1/4" panel is harder to get, more expensive and you typically have to buy it in increments of 200sqft at a time. It's easier to make an apples-to-apples comparison on the cost based on a price per "square" of coverage since you will have a greater percent of material overlapped with the smaller panels, and for cedar and other natural wood products the heights of the overlaps may be different.

Just as a point of reference, the big box stores are advetising the primed 8 1/4" panels now for $7.00 a piece.

15pc = 1 square, so:

15x$7.00=$105.00 per square.

The 6 1/4 and 7 1/4 are usually in the same ballpark, maybe 5% more. Generally the prepainted stuff is about $30-40 more per square, but IMO well worth it as the factory finish is almost certainly better than what you could apply in the field.

Last I checked the 5 1/4" panel was around $200 per square for pre-painted.
Matt, Thanks for the info, but I think you have just muddied the waters of my old brain ...

1. I guess that the Hardie board doesn't come in 6" width? and that my choices are 5 1/4, 6 1/4, or 7 1/4?

2. The reason I was trying to figure out the lineal foot price was to try and do an apples to apples comparison. My home has 6" bevel lap siding with about a 4" reveal. In order to keep the same shadow lines and angles, I would guess I'll need to go with the 6 1/4?

3. I can get this stuff at Home Despot? Or Slowes?

4. I'm not going to go the extra expense of getting the factory pre-finished unless they offer them in Sherwin Williams' Rookwood Red, flat finish.
Square, Plumb, or Level ... Pick two.
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S Melissa
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Re: hardie board

Post by S Melissa »

Bob - I think you can get it at HD/lowes - but do check out local lumber yards, the prices may be better at the builder yards than at the DIY centers.

They have a number of colors - check it out - don't know if they have it in the color of your choice however. The factory paint job is supposed to be guaranteed for 15 yrs I believe. I think just about any new paint job should last that long however, if not longer on this stuff - fading will be the issue rather than peeling or other failure.
Melissa
Canton, MI
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MattS
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Re: hardie board

Post by MattS »

Matt, Thanks for the info, but I think you have just muddied the waters of my old brain ...

1. I guess that the Hardie board doesn't come in 6" width? and that my choices are 5 1/4, 6 1/4, or 7 1/4?

2. The reason I was trying to figure out the lineal foot price was to try and do an apples to apples comparison. My home has 6" bevel lap siding with about a 4" reveal. In order to keep the same shadow lines and angles, I would guess I'll need to go with the 6 1/4?
All the Hardie panels have a 1 1/4" lap, so your choices of exposure height are 4", 5", 6", or 7". If you want to maintain the 4" exposure, then you would have to compare the lineal foot price of the 6" bevel siding to the 5 1/4 hardie to get equivalent wall coverage . So just at a rough guestimate of $170 per square for unpainted 5 1/4" hardie the pricing would work out like this.

25pc = 1 sq
1pc = 12 linft
25x12=300 linft per square

$170/300 linft = ~ $0.57 per lineal ft.

As I said before, if you can live with a 5" or larger reveal, you'll save a bundle of money vs the 4", but first and foremost, get what you want and what looks right on the house.

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