JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

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JRC
Posts: 285
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:15 pm
Location: Youngstown, Ohio

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by JRC »

Thanks for the replies.

I know what you mean about commiseration, Fanner. In my old neighborhood, no one understands the concepts of restoration and preservation. They still think that vinyl siding and vinyl windows are improvements, and wouldn't understand why anyone would choose to go through all that trouble to repaint, when "vinyl is final."

JRC
Posts: 285
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:15 pm
Location: Youngstown, Ohio

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by JRC »

I started cleaning the kitchen last weekend. But that job quickly evolved into stripping the layers of contact paper off of the original counter tops. (I think it's linoleum)

Just getting started:
Image

All of the contact paper is gone:
Image

The other counter top, on the opposite corner of the kitchen near the stove, isn't coming out so well. The counter surface is in really bad shape. (although the back splash is OK) So, for now, I think I'm going to pull up the damaged linoleum, (or at least try) and replace with some matching peel and stick tiles.

This was an exciting find for me, because I had assumed the original surface was a similar "Wedgwood blue" tile, or something. And, I was disgusted by the top layer of contact paper, and am glad that there is something mostly useful underneath.

nezwick
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Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by nezwick »

Cool! I LOVE metal-edged countertops.
The McCullough/Simkins house, built 1872-1877:
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sooth
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Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by sooth »

Just so you know, you might be better off finding a matching laminate for it (100x better and more durable than peel and stick tiles). Where I work, we have literally hundreds of laminate samples we can order (Formica, Arborite, and Wilsonart each have at least 100-200 samples, and you can probably also browse online). Full sheets are around 150$ (5x8 or a bit more for a 5x10), but if you can find a counter top place nearby, they often have off-cuts and you just might get lucky and get a real deal (we have thousands of partial sheet pieces). I'm sure I've seen similar swirly black patterns.

http://samples.wilsonart.com/c-135-new- ... ilter=true&
http://www.formica.com/trade/laminate/patterns/
http://arborite.com/en/High-pressure-La ... -Abstracts

I assume you're keeping/fixing the existing kitchen for now? It looks pretty decent. I don't really remember what the kitchen looked like, so I'll have to scroll through your photos again.
JC
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JRC
Posts: 285
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Location: Youngstown, Ohio

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by JRC »

sooth wrote:Just so you know, you might be better off finding a matching laminate for it (100x better and more durable than peel and stick tiles). Where I work, we have literally hundreds of laminate samples we can order (Formica, Arborite, and Wilsonart each have at least 100-200 samples, and you can probably also browse online). Full sheets are around 150$ (5x8 or a bit more for a 5x10), but if you can find a counter top place nearby, they often have off-cuts and you just might get lucky and get a real deal (we have thousands of partial sheet pieces). I'm sure I've seen similar swirly black patterns.

http://samples.wilsonart.com/c-135-new- ... ilter=true&
http://www.formica.com/trade/laminate/patterns/
http://arborite.com/en/High-pressure-La ... -Abstracts

I assume you're keeping/fixing the existing kitchen for now? It looks pretty decent. I don't really remember what the kitchen looked like, so I'll have to scroll through your photos again.
Thanks for the links. I work for an architecture firm, so we have a library of samples, too.

This is just a temporary fix until I can redo the kitchen. I know many people here would love my 1950s kitchen, but everything except the floor and the sink is at the end of its useful life. The wood cabinets are starting to fall apart, and the metal cabinets are beat up and rusty. And, I just plain don't like it, it lets the rest of the house down, IMO.

BigBill
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Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2010 9:57 pm

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by BigBill »

We were at the same position as you with our old kitchen. I was going to rip up the linoleum on the counter tops and cover it with new linoleum as a temporary long term fix. We do not plan on moving into the house on a permanent basis for a couple more years. At that time the kitchen will be redone. In the meantime we wanted something better than the ugly old pinkish faded linoleum that had who knows what on it at one time or another. After some research I decided to try the Rustoleum Countertop transformation kit. I was skeptical after reading some of the reviews but decided to give it a try anyway. We could not be more happy with the results. It looks a whole lot better than what was there and is a lot more durable than what i would have imagined. Did not have to remove the old lineolum. I added some trim on the ends of the counter tops. The entire process took two days and was less than 200 bucks. It is cheaper ordered thru amazon than at the big box stores and there are several colors.
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JRC
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Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by JRC »

It's been a long time since I posted anything. I haven't been doing anything photo-worthy.

But last week, I painted the kitchen, and put the temporary surface on the damaged counter top.
Image
Image

New--temporary--counter top:
Image

I still want to paint the cabinets, too.

But next week, I plan to paint the foyer, stairwell, and upstairs hall.

Raine
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Location: Minnesota

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by Raine »

Hey , that looks good ! what did you use for the counter top ?
Image

sooth
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Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by sooth »

Raine: I'm pretty sure those are just the peel and stick tiles he mentioned, which will work just fine for now. He already mentioned that he plans to eventually replace the entire kitchen with something better quality and "more fitting" with the house.

JRC: Are you planning to strip the woodwork in this room? It seems as though 95% of your woodwork is unpainted, and I know you did an awesome job on the bathroom so far, but I wasn't sure if you had planned to do these are well. If so, it might be easier to remove them from the walls/doors to strip them, and reinstall them.

I really like that unusual panelled door, too.
JC
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JRC
Posts: 285
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 3:15 pm
Location: Youngstown, Ohio

Re: JRC's Nightmare on Elm Street (lots of pictures)

Post by JRC »

sooth wrote:Raine: I'm pretty sure those are just the peel and stick tiles he mentioned, which will work just fine for now. He already mentioned that he plans to eventually replace the entire kitchen with something better quality and "more fitting" with the house.
Yes. And, by "more fitting" I mean I want the kitchen to look like a large butlers pantry.
sooth wrote:JRC: Are you planning to strip the woodwork in this room? It seems as though 95% of your woodwork is unpainted, and I know you did an awesome job on the bathroom so far, but I wasn't sure if you had planned to do these are well. If so, it might be easier to remove them from the walls/doors to strip them, and reinstall them.

I really like that unusual panelled door, too.
I'm not sure if I'll strip the woodwork in here, yet. There is the same kind of wainscot in the kitchen as there is in the bathroom. I'm not sure how high it goes, or what condition it is under the panelling. I guess they probably glued panelling to the walls, since I don't see any other form of attachment. But I know the wainscot is there, because I can see it under the sink, and where the cabinet meets the wall, where the stove goes. (to the far right in the first picture)

BTW, the door you like was originally the back door, when that bathroom was the back porch. On the other side of the opening, you can still see the shadow of where the screen door hinges were attached to the outside frame.

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