pix of 1941 home

Questions, answers and advice for people who own or work on houses built during the 20th century.

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lrkrgrrl
Posts: 4733
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:50 am
Location: Northeast

Post by lrkrgrrl »

I looks and sounds a lot like the Modern "This Old House" was working on this fall, even to the extent of being in the middle of a neighborhood of older historic homes.

Mrs. Bloomfield
Posts: 59
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 4:28 pm

Post by Mrs. Bloomfield »

Oh goodness! That is one UGLY house. I'm so glad it's a "no-go" and you're not buying it! Whew...

lrkrgrrl
Posts: 4733
Joined: Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:50 am
Location: Northeast

Post by lrkrgrrl »

Poor house. Mrs. Bloomfield doesn't appreciate your underlying qualities. I don't know if I could live in one, but I do admire the intent and creativity of the Modern school, when properly executed. I would guess this poor little house has been "remuddled" and its original builder/architect would be saddened by it's current state. And for 1941 this is pretty cutting-edge design, before many of these features were "dumbed down" and incorporated into the quick-build post-war housing.

On "This Old House" as they toured some other Modern designed homes, I really liked the way they went from larger, open, shared space to very small, cozy personal spaces. And I really liked the way the big windows brought the outdoors in, and that there were lots of outdoor living spaces: patios, balconies, whatnot. Although, I'm really a rocker on the verandah type of grrl.

I'd paint the poor thing more of an earth color, in my opinon: deep red, or slaty green, to unite it a little more with the natural landscape. The foundation plantings are overgrown, which messes up the transition to building from the natural surroundings. That roof looks like someone raised the angle, thinking to improve the shedding of snow. The Modern style flat roof rarely serves well in the snowy northeast without a little coddling.

Maybe when I have to re-do the former "carriage barn" building that everyone thinks is a mobile home, I'll honor it's Modern design heritage, weird angles, big windows, and all. 8)

oxford
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2005 2:49 pm

Post by oxford »

Please burn that house down. Oh darn it, it's concrete. Maybe a bulldozer.

Don M
Posts: 6965
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2003 11:35 am
Location: Boiling Springs, PA

Post by Don M »

Well it's not really that bad; I am not a big fan of flat roofed '50s modern houses but I do like a lot of Frank L Wright's designs and there are a lot of his elements in some of those modern homes. I wasn't very pleased with TOH's project house this year but I will say it has grown on me over time. One needs to keep an open mind I guess! Don

S
Posts: 920
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 1:11 pm
Location: Midwest
Contact:

Post by S »

You should take a look at This Old House's Cambridge House (their current project). Of course, they have gutted the whole thing and now are replacing the original w/o outlandishly expensive new stuff.........BUT the side stories on the Modern movement are quite interesting.....and remarkably similar to the design of your house.
StuccoHouse

1924 Bungalow

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