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DIY Storm Windows Part 1

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DIY Storm Windows Part 1

Postby Danno » Wed May 30, 2007 1:43 am

ok. I'm making an instructional on how to make some exterior wood storm windows. The final product will be a pdf file with plenty of information, but I thought I'd give bits and pieces here so you can track my progress as well as perhaps making a commitment that will push me further than my usual 85% completion record on any given project.

Of course there are like a billion different ways to make a storm window. Mine is intended to be done by just about anyone who can get there hands on the cheap tools I'm using. The final product will include a "tool list" as well as hints on material purchasing.

so,

1) measure the receptical a million times.
2) cut wood once
3) fit up pieces in window to make sure it will fit and then label location and direction
3.5) clean up tools in living room to make room for your storm window
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4) make joint, I used a dowel joint jig seen here:
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5) here are some pictures of making those joints
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6) Do a test fit
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7) Route the Rabbets on the horizontal pieces.
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8) Fit it together and mark the edge of the verticle pieces for the rabbet
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9)Route the verticle pieces
10) glue and clamp pieces
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(coming soon... Chisel rabbet corners, sanding, measure and cut glass, putting in glazing points, test fit two, glazing putty application, making a seal, installation system.... two weeks later paint)
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Postby dfiler » Wed May 30, 2007 8:29 am

Thanks! Keep it coming. Your pictures are allowing me to completely visualize the process before diving in.

Storm windows are on my list of things to do. Granted, that list is a decade long. But my gas bill from last winter provide is one hell of a motivation. :wink:
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Postby S Melissa » Wed May 30, 2007 10:38 am

When you're done - if ever ( :lol: ) this should go on the "reference" page . As I look at your process it is very similar to that which we didi for "interior storms" tho we used smaller scale stock to make them lighter to move in and out of the frames - and they didn't need to stand up to weather. So, for those interested in inside or out - this would be a good guide.

Oh, by the way - nice fingernails! :wink:
Melissa
Canton, MI
1860 Italianate - Reuben Huston Home
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Postby Danno » Wed May 30, 2007 10:52 am

FYI, here's the cost-to-date of the project:

Materials:
1x3x8' - 4.78
1x3x8' - 4.78
1x3x4' - 2.44
1x4x6' - 4.15
dowels - 0.98
wood glue - 3.96
glazing - 3.19
push points - 1.04

New tools (woohoo):
Glass Cutter - 2.60
3 Clamps - 23.46
Wood Chisel - 10.43
Rubber Mallet - 2.97
Dowel Kit - 4.19
Dowel Jig - 9.95

Total so far: Material: 25.32; Tools: 53.60

I estimate that I'll be able to use that glue on all windows, cause I got a big thing. I also estimate that I can use a caulk of the glazing over two windows as well as the thing of dowels over two windows.

I have a total of 7 windows on the first floor that are of similar size.
so initial estimates will be about $140 in basic materials. This does not include mounting "system" or primer/paint. I still estimate being able to spend 200 or less for my 7 first floor windows. I have 6 smaller sized windows on the second floor (just as wide, not as tall) so that should come out to less than 200 dollars.

I'm estimating 3 hours per window (trust me, that's a REALLY high estimate). So those of you who like to get paid for your "labor (of love)" can figure that one out. lets say better than minimum, but not much because it's not like anyone here is a real pro! i know I'm not. $7.50 per hour over 13 windows = 295ish dollars. So, you find me a deal where you can get 13 wooden storms at 295labor, 400 parts, 53.60 in tools that you get to keep!! (150 of you had to buy the router and table).

You'll notice that I didn't include the cost of glass. I'm finding out real quick that if you cant find free glass you aren't looking hard enough. Now, that may not be true in all areas, and that's a big expense in this project I know. In fact I might be jumping the gun on all of this as I haven't actually tried to cut and fit my glass yet. That will come tonight. Be prepared for cursing..... So, it may be reasonable to expect to BUY and HAVE GLASS CUT FOR YOU. This will dramatically increase the cost.

Am I missing anything? HB?
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Postby S » Wed May 30, 2007 1:21 pm

If you save even one person from having to go through the aluminum triple track horror I was forced to live through, you have earned your halo ;-)
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Postby HB » Wed May 30, 2007 1:29 pm

Danno, you are a dope! I can't believe you forgot to mention the need for a lubricant.
It is a key indgredient. It's VERY important on a job like this.

My favorite (lately) is Yuengling Porter. :shock:

Seriously though, great instructions.

Here's a couple of tips I picked up along the way for when I finally get around to :oops: making our interior storms.

Get a remnant of indoor/outdoor carpeting (or some other thin piece of commercial carpeting) to cut the glass on. A large enough piece to hold the entire piece of glass that you need to cut and a countertop or other flat surface to spread it out on.

A little bit of mineral spirits on the glass where you plan to make the cut makes the glass cutter move much easier across the surface. The pro that gave me instructions on cutting glass kept his glass cutter in a coffee can with about 1 inch of mineral spirits in the bottom of the can.

BTW THANKS for mentioning that you shouldn't have to pay for glass. I didn't ever really think about finding it for free, but now that you mention it, why not!!!

Thanks Danno!

HB

PS - What species/grade of wood are you using?
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Postby Danno » Wed May 30, 2007 2:06 pm

HB wrote:Danno, you are a dope! I can't believe you forgot to mention the need for a lubricant.
It is a key indgredient. It's VERY important on a job like this.

My favorite (lately) is Yuengling Porter. :shock:

Seriously though, great instructions.

Here's a couple of tips I picked up along the way for when I finally get around to :oops: making our interior storms.

Get a remnant of indoor/outdoor carpeting (or some other thin piece of commercial carpeting) to cut the glass on. A large enough piece to hold the entire piece of glass that you need to cut and a countertop or other flat surface to spread it out on.

A little bit of mineral spirits on the glass where you plan to make the cut makes the glass cutter move much easier across the surface. The pro that gave me instructions on cutting glass kept his glass cutter in a coffee can with about 1 inch of mineral spirits in the bottom of the can.

BTW THANKS for mentioning that you shouldn't have to pay for glass. I didn't ever really think about finding it for free, but now that you mention it, why not!!!

Thanks Danno!

HB

PS - What species/grade of wood are you using?

That was a three beer project last night, thanks for reminding me.... I love summer vacations....

As for mineral spirits and the other cutting advice, thanks for that. I had seen plenty of sites saying to make sure I use water when I do it, but nobody ever mentioned the Mineral spirits, or at least I don't remember it.

That wood is the select grade pine. I debated for days about what wood to use. After lots of research it came down to the following concept: It's not just the wood it's also the surface treatment. There are way better suited woods for the outside, but when followed up with a good primer and paint treatment the pine should be completely adequate. This means no slacking in upkeep. Another consideration is the ease of pine to use. some woods are just a little harder to route, cut, drill, etc. If I can work with an easier wood the window will go together better and probably last a little longer. Pine may rot faster than some, but what good is a pile of perfect boards because the joints didnt hold fast. So, if you are really into woodworking, maybe a red cedar or something would be way better, but then it costs more too. I guess there is only one test for this, check back in ten years I'll let you know.....
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Postby HB » Wed May 30, 2007 3:59 pm

I agree with using whatever wood as long as you do the maintenance and prep it right the first time.

The problem with any rot will come at the joints, where the expansion and contraction of the wood can crack the paint on the joint, letting moisture in there. That's where all sashes rot.

I wonder if it would be a good thing to prime the dowels so that any water that did get into the joint wouldn't rot the dowel. Although that would prevent the glue from working properly wouldn't it..... Maybe a waterproof glue would be the best bet?

It may also be a good idea to pre treat the wood before priming with a 50-50 solution of paint thinner and paint to get it deep into the wood before priming it. Or I've heard of people using penetrol with the primer to help it get deeper into the wood.

Also be sure to bed the glass in putty as well. If you don't, any moisture inside the house that gets past the original window and condenses on the inside of the storm window could build up and rot out the glazing rabbet

I look forward to your follow up posting (in November) when you actually complete the window........ By the way, how's that table coming along? :D

HB - who's only 8 months into his 12 x 14 stone patio project :cry:
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Postby andrewro » Wed May 30, 2007 4:30 pm

This is great! I've been thinking about making wooden screens and from what I can tell, these plans could easily be adapted.
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Postby Tujo » Wed May 30, 2007 11:32 pm

Danno - great job. I have to rebuild a storm on the front of my house, and thanks to you I now have a much better idea of what to do.
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