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Re: DIY storm windows

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:55 am

S wrote:
anti wrote:
S wrote:Working Windows by Terance Meany


WOW!!! It's about 130$ on Amazon!!!!! Anything a little cheaper?!!?


You might do a search of OHW - there was a thread a month or so ago that gave a list of places to get it including the publisher. It's out of print, but can still be found for about $15. I found mine at my local Barnes & Noble store. My library also has multiple copies.

I swear I bought mine just a couple months ago for like $7 something plus shipping.!!!

Re: DIY storm windows

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:18 pm

Danno wrote:
S wrote:
anti wrote:
S wrote:Working Windows by Terance Meany


WOW!!! It's about 130$ on Amazon!!!!! Anything a little cheaper?!!?


You might do a search of OHW - there was a thread a month or so ago that gave a list of places to get it including the publisher. It's out of print, but can still be found for about $15. I found mine at my local Barnes & Noble store. My library also has multiple copies.

I swear I bought mine just a couple months ago for like $7 something plus shipping.!!!


Where did you buy it from?!?! I can't find it anywhere!!

Re: DIY storm windows

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:19 pm

Danno wrote:
S wrote:
anti wrote:
S wrote:Working Windows by Terance Meany


WOW!!! It's about 130$ on Amazon!!!!! Anything a little cheaper?!!?


You might do a search of OHW - there was a thread a month or so ago that gave a list of places to get it including the publisher. It's out of print, but can still be found for about $15. I found mine at my local Barnes & Noble store. My library also has multiple copies.

I swear I bought mine just a couple months ago for like $7 something plus shipping.!!!


Where did you buy it from?!?! I can't find it anywhere!!

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:25 pm

try books on ebay. i find a lot of way cool stuff there for very reasonable prices.

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:33 pm

The $130 price is for an updated (2005) 230+/- page book. The other one referenced is about 60 pages or so......Yikes. glad I have my old copy....now if I can just find it.

Great details Danno. Now just....need......motivation........

scoring glass

Thu Jun 07, 2007 9:55 pm

Great thread - lots of good information.

Just a few quick comments on scoring glass.

First, don't press down very hard on the cutter. Gentle is good. If done correctly, you should barely be able to see the score line. If you have those little chips of glass along the edges of the score line, then you pressed down to hard. Ease off a little on the next one.

Second, the reason for using cutting oil - and mineral spirits is an excellent choice - is primarily because glass "heals" (it is sometimes referred to as "scabing") when scored. When glass has healed it becomes very difficult to get a good break-out. Mineral spirits fills the score line and prevents the glass from healing allowing a much cleaner break.

When you need to remove a narrow edge (and there was some great advice concerning using glazing pliers in the thread), score the glass and then taking the glass at the edge where you started your score line apply pressure to gently open the score and let the opening "run" the length of the score line. Don't try to force it - let the glass do the work.

That last is a bit hard to describe but very easy to show someone...

Also, if you happen to be cutting different thicknesses of glass, it might benefit you to have a couple different scoring tools with different angled cutting wheels. Sharper angles for thinner glass and wider angles for thicker glass.

Good luck!

Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:08 pm

BrooklynRowHouse wrote:
HB wrote:The Festool is a cool tool. It's just way, way overpriced (like all of their power tools. I mean, really, $260 for an orbital sander?!)


But dang, that's an AWESOME sander! :)

Jason

Sun Jun 10, 2007 10:18 pm

so what are those little metal things called?

Teri

Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:24 am

sundine2 wrote:so what are those little metal things called?

Teri

those things that i used to mark the dowel drilling spots? I have NO IDEA, they came in that cheapo dowel kit. I bet the instructions said "insert the *thingamabobs" into the drilled holes and...", but I threw the instructions away, so i don't know what they are called!!

Thu Aug 16, 2007 3:52 am

I hate to necropost, but as a long time woodworker and furniture builder I wanted to provide a few insights about the nature of wood and the best ways to assemble something of this nature.

Please not, I'm to trying o come across as having all the ansawers, a jerk, or a know it all. But there are several principles of woodwrkering that could be observed to greatly enhance the beauty and overal durability of these windows.

First things first. Pine while it may be about half the price of cedar will not wear as well, is not period, and is a poor choice for exterior fixtures. Cedar is a closed pore wood and will wear far, far, far better than pine. even painted.

Secondly a but joint is one of the weakest joints you can make. End grain wood is very poor at gluing and lacks the strength to last more than a few years. at best. Long grain joints provide the strongst joint and the most available gluing surface.

A good choice for a joint to replace the butt joint would be the bridle joint. It creates a set of fingers on one piece, and a single finger on the other. This provides lots of long grain surface for glue to grab onto, and is easy to cut on a router or table saw. Additionally it is the preferred joint of the original builders.

The more complex joint which is arguably the best is the mortise and tenon joint. A finger and pocket arrangement milled into the wood provides structural rigidity as well as good surface area for glue up.

Either of these joints would lend them self well to pinning which provides a mechanical retention of the joint if the glue were to fail.

If you are going to use dowels. use a dowel that is wider. a 3/4" thick board should receive a dowel 3/8 in diameter. Typically try for a 50/50 split between dowel thickness and stock thickness. You could even go 1/2 and not compromise structural strength. Just remember, dowels and biscuits are more of an alignment method and much less for structural strength.

So, in the end I hope you take the knowledge I'm offering as just that. knowledge. As I said I'm not trying to come off as preachy, just trying to inform that there are better way to build something if it is indented to last.
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