reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

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pqtex
Posts: 1319
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Location: Beaumont, Texas

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

I have found a stove I like the looks of, but one burner doesn't work. It has also been converted to propane, but I've been told (by the owner) that I can easily get a kit to convert it back. He's asking $300. I haven't talked price yet, but he seems willing to negotiate. His ad has also been up for about a month, so that possibly gives him incentive to negotiate some. One drawback is that the stove is located several hours away from me, so it isn't something I can run look at without some careful consideration...
tappan.jpg
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tappan1.jpg
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Anyway, according to the seller:
This white enamel Super 60 series Tappan Deluxe Gas Stove was bought by my parents in the early 1950’s. Great for anyone designing a retro kitchen!

Model #PHAV 668 has

• Stainless steel or chrome oven back and sides
• Separate broiler opens with foot pedal
• 4 burners—covers store inside the doors
• Doors that open for storage—inside is slide out tray with salt and pepper shakers, towel bar, roll-out wire storage rack, 2 drawers, crisper drawer
• Original manual included

This stove was in use until August 2009, when it was moved into storage due to remodeling. It was in working order when moved, but needs cleaning and minor repair. Used with propane gas. Dimensions are 37” high (46” at back) x 40” wide x 27” deep
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My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

Too bad the spam got so bad. Some of us have been spending time at the new community for folks with a love of old houses at wavyglass.org

pqtex
Posts: 1319
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:03 pm
Location: Beaumont, Texas

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

artfox wrote: While I love to cook and would like the nostalgic look of a period stove for my 30's kitchen, I've reached the point in my life when I need convenience more than authenticity for everyday tasks. I really don't want all the fancy electronic gadgetry on the gas ranges displayed in appliance stores, so I may have to order a model from the internet to get the features I want. As a veteran appliance repairman told me, "the fewer bells and whistles an appliance has, the less there is to go wrong".
I agree. That's one of the reasons I am torn between a vintage stove and a new one. The Tappan I just posted pics of reminds me of the type of stove my grandmother used to cook on when I was a kid. I don't know what brand it was. I know that my great-grandmother cooked on a wood cookstove, but when my great-grandfather bought her a "modern" stove, she wouldn't give up the wood stove, and according to family lore, both stoves remained in the kitchen! It may have been finally given up during the war drive for scrap metal during WWII. She donated a lot to that drive.

I would probably buy a new stove if I could get a plain, rounded, basic look in the 40" width without all of the electronic controls, just so I didn't have to worry about getting parts or a repairman, but a new stove isn't really a guarantee of that, either.

I appreciate the input about the difficulty in cleaning the griddle. I had seen something similar on another site once I started researching. I currently use a griddle that fits over my burners that is easy to clean. I'd probably be happier with that anyway. I asked my mother about the thermowell because I thought I remembered one on her old stove. She remembered it and said she never used it much either.
Image
My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

Too bad the spam got so bad. Some of us have been spending time at the new community for folks with a love of old houses at wavyglass.org

BobG
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by BobG »

rehabbingisgreen wrote:Bobg,
Can you help me?
I have a very similar stove, although in not near as nice condition. MIne seems to be missing something that should hold the grates up in the middle or it's the wrong grate, I don't know. It caves in the middle. I'll see if I can find a pic.
The grates should be long enough to span from front to back. If your stove is from about the same year as mine, those are probably the wrong grates. It looks like they are a bit too rounded at the corners for the opening.
Square, Plumb, or Level ... Pick two.
Our Home: 3,550sf 1891 Queen Anne / Victorian Eclectic
http://www.1160main.com/webdoc7.htm
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rehabbingisgreen
Posts: 892
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 10:26 am

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by rehabbingisgreen »

BobG wrote:
rehabbingisgreen wrote:Bobg,
Can you help me?
I have a very similar stove, although in not near as nice condition. MIne seems to be missing something that should hold the grates up in the middle or it's the wrong grate, I don't know. It caves in the middle. I'll see if I can find a pic.
The grates should be long enough to span from front to back. If your stove is from about the same year as mine, those are probably the wrong grates. It looks like they are a bit too rounded at the corners for the opening.
If you get some time sometime, I'm not in a hurry, could you snap a pic with the grate off so I can see better the area the grate sits on? Yeah it looks like my grates are wrong, oh boy I hope those aren't a hard thing to find.
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moonshadow317
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by moonshadow317 »

PQ,
If you get the tappan (looks really good) here's a great link to check out

http://tappantalk.blogspot.com/

Karen
Karen
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pqtex
Posts: 1319
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:03 pm
Location: Beaumont, Texas

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by pqtex »

moonshadow317 wrote:PQ,
If you get the tappan (looks really good) here's a great link to check out

http://tappantalk.blogspot.com/

Karen
Thanks. I found that site during my internet roaming for info. I wish I could find more info on the cost of parts! :-) I might not get that particular stove, but I am leaning towards that type.

Interesting note is that while I was looking for info, I found something interesting on the Chambers stoves, that they are designed to cook with the gas off! That's right...the proper way to cook is to heat for a certain length of time and then turn off the oven. Apparently they were so well designed with such good insulation, that the heat is evenly retained to properly cook the food to perfection. so, if you have a Chambers stove, try to locate the manual and cookbook that came with it.
Image
My great-grandparents' 1913 farmhouse

Too bad the spam got so bad. Some of us have been spending time at the new community for folks with a love of old houses at wavyglass.org

artfox
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by artfox »

When I finally get the kitchen renovation going and buy my new stove, one feature I want is continuous cast iron top grates so I can slide heavy pots from one burner to another. Commercial ranges always had them but only in recent years have they appeared on regular stoves.

BobG
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by BobG »

rehabbingisgreen wrote:If you get some time sometime, I'm not in a hurry, could you snap a pic with the grate off so I can see better the area the grate sits on? Yeah it looks like my grates are wrong, oh boy I hope those aren't a hard thing to find.
I'll try and get a pic and get it posted. I need to get the camera out anyway to get a picture of my new (old) bracket clock.
Square, Plumb, or Level ... Pick two.
Our Home: 3,550sf 1891 Queen Anne / Victorian Eclectic
http://www.1160main.com/webdoc7.htm
visit my blog and make a comment
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thomas4square
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Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:05 pm

Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by thomas4square »

I have a 50's Merritt O'Keefe with a center griddle, and it is the best stove i have ever used including commercial ranges. The burners have small center burners for simmering which are really good. I bought it for $100 off of ebay, brought it home cleaned it and it works great. It probbaly uses more energy than a new stove as it has 3 pilot lights, but i have had months where i have left if off due to kitchen renovations, and have not noticed much difference in my gas bill. My plumber even stated that stoves use a very negligible amount of gas anyway. I will second someone else's comment that the griddle is a little bit of a pain to clean, but we just let it cool down a little and clean it with steel wool pads when it is still a little warm. I learned that trick from the japanese hibachi restaurant :wink: . We had a 50's hotpoint also at one time, but had to get rid of it as the oven stopped heating well and 2 of the burners didnt work, and it was impossible to find parts for it since the valves cant just be rebuilt like on the gas stoves.

lisascenic
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Re: reliability/function vintage stoves versus new

Post by lisascenic »

A vintage Wedgewood stove came with our house. We think it's late 40s or early 50s. It cooks like a dream. French Bread that's to die for!!!!

In truth, I'd love to have a 1920s stove, and we're keeping one eye for one. But there's no real reason to remove this baby, since she cooks so beautifully.

I can't figure how to attach a photo on this computer, so I'll try to post a link to our blog.

http://howsrobb.blogspot.com/2009/06/ju ... -glee.html

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