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"Dip and Strip"

Questions and answers relating to houses built in the 1800s and before.

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"Dip and Strip"

Postby Sharon Wade » Sun Aug 25, 2002 9:55 pm

Has anyone ever had architectural pieces of their homes "dipped" in order to remove paint? I have 6 cypress 18" diameter columns that I have removed from my front porch in order to have my house moved. I've been using a heat gun and carbide scrapers to remove 15+ layers of paint and needless to say, it's going very slow!! About 10-12 hrs. per column since they're fluted. I'm hesitant to dip 100 year old wood in any kind of a solvent for fear of damage, but several people have mentioned this method to me. If anyone has done this, or knows of someone in North Texas that does this, please let me know! Thanks so much!

jsslwade@charter.net
Sharon Wade
 

Re: "Dip and Strip"

Postby Doug Seibert » Sun Aug 25, 2002 11:03 pm

So how long/tall are these?????? How big a tank?

dougseibert2001@yahoo.com
Doug Seibert
 

Re: "Dip and Strip"

Postby Jeanne » Mon Aug 26, 2002 1:03 pm

Sharon,

The thing with furniture dippers is some of them re-use the stripping chemicals left over from previous jobs, so it could take a few dips for each piece unless you get a fresh tank. Also, letting the wood soak in the chemical bath could easily loosen glued joints. The Yellow Pages should have dippers listed under "furniture refinishing."

I know doors are not the same as columns, but my aunt had 30-some doors dipped, and the doors are about 6 feet tall. She got pretty good results. I've stripped my doors (17 so far) with a heat gun and then a quick coat of CitriStrip. The fluting on your columns will be hard to strip whether you use a heat gun or chemicals, but removing all those layers of paint will make them look nice and crisp!

Good luck! Jeanne

jfuller246@aol.com
Jeanne
 

Re: "Dip and Strip"

Postby Chris » Tue Aug 27, 2002 3:04 pm

Sharon,

A long while back, I had an old dresser dipped with mixed results... the paint was gone, but the grain was raised (requiring a lot of sanding), the joints were all loosened and several key parts were warped. I’ve since been told these are common side effects of a heated dip tank process where the wood is cleaned afterwards with water. A “cold dip” followed by cleanup with mineral spirits or paint thinner should be just the ticket for you. You can do this yourself, if you want…I’ve used this process with all my window sashes with terrific success. Here’s what I did: I built a frame out of scrap 1x10” an inch or so bigger all around then my work pieces. I then got the heaviest plastic drop I could find, and, with the frame laying flat on the garage floor, lined the inside (leaving enough extra to fold back over the top). Then, I placed the work pieces inside the frame, filled it with the least expensive stripper I could find (enough to cover the piece) and folded over the extra plastic. Let it sit for at least 24 hours, pull it out and scrape & clean as directed on the stripper can (don’t use water). This uses quite a bit of stripper (I should think 5-10 gallons for a porch post), but you can reuse the contents of your tank several times at least.

saraceni@aaahawk.com
Chris
 

Re: "Dip and Strip"

Postby Sharon Wade » Wed Aug 28, 2002 8:29 am

Thanks for all the info and suggestions. I actually found a place with a vat large enough to do this. He's testing one end to determine how many "dips" each column will take. His first estimate was $200 to strip each column!! If he can't come off that, I'll definitely be doing the work myself! I haven't had much luck so far with using a chemical stripper on these, but it's probably the type I'm using. Thanks again for all your input.

jsslwade@charter.net
Sharon Wade
 


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