Search found 349 matches

by Jim K in PA
Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:59 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Tell Me About That Sash Hardware
Replies: 9
Views: 2102

Rusty, First, congratulations on the acquisition. Definately post pictures when you can. I went to elementary school in a late 19th century building that still had it's original windows until the late 1970s. You are correct, in that the upper sashes were pulled down for ventilation using a long wood...
by Jim K in PA
Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:45 pm
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Help with flooring question, please?**Update!**
Replies: 24
Views: 6212

It does appear to be a mix of flat and quarter-sawn red oak. It will be tough to blend a patch, even if you strip the original floor completely.

It looks like the one patched area was for a former floor register. Why not reinstall a register over a block off plate?
by Jim K in PA
Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:01 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Glazing putty dry time ?
Replies: 17
Views: 16006

Thanks HB. I will look into the Sarco - I have no doubt it is a good priduct, but from what I read over at HHW it is only available in large containers. I am not working on my windows at a rate fast enough to use up a multi-gallon container before it reaches the end of it's shelf life. I might try t...
by Jim K in PA
Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:31 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Glazing putty dry time ?
Replies: 17
Views: 16006

Sorry to dig up this old thread, but I searched for past questions on glazing dry times and found a wealth of info. HB - thanks for the link to the other site and that thread. I read all 5 pages, but I still do not see a clear answer to which glazing material is "best" for any one particular situati...
by Jim K in PA
Wed Dec 05, 2007 3:47 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Need Old Slate Roof Advice
Replies: 11
Views: 6823

Al, you are correct. This is an old post, but for those reading it, get a copy of the Slate Roof Bible from http://www.jenkinsslate.com It will be invaluable to anyone with a slate roof, or considering a house with one. After reading that book I put a slate roof on our addition and replaced all of t...
by Jim K in PA
Fri Oct 26, 2007 9:30 am
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Can you believe this?
Replies: 16
Views: 3872

Our story is similar to others. We paid $208k for our farmhouse and 9 acres. Initial insured replacement valuation was $180k total. We did a bunch of work, including a new slate roof and an addition (modified timber frame). My insco annually updates replacement values, but I filled out the survey fo...
by Jim K in PA
Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:40 pm
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Shower Walls
Replies: 9
Views: 2023

Thanks Connie! Those prices are much better, and bonus for shipping included. I need a 48x96 and a 36x96 panel, plus a few of the accessories. I still can't believe what this stuff costs, but the tradeoff of less hours spent cleaning the tile/grout is worth it, IMO. A lot less work at installation t...
by Jim K in PA
Wed Jun 20, 2007 3:52 pm
Forum: Pre-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Shower Walls
Replies: 9
Views: 2023

After still more researching, I decided to use Swanstone. I have all the pieces, pan, walls, shelves, seat, and soap dish, but they haven't been installed yet. The quality of the parts is good, the instructions are pretty straight forward, and I expect it to go up without much trouble. If you decid...
by Jim K in PA
Mon May 21, 2007 12:50 pm
Forum: The Hangout Forum
Topic: Can dry rotted windows be saved?
Replies: 6
Views: 2473

I am restoring about 25 sets of sashes in this condition using epoxy stabilizer and filler from System Three. It is amazing how well these systems work. It takes time and patience, but preserving original windows is well worth it, IMO.
by Jim K in PA
Wed May 02, 2007 2:16 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Strange Floor Joists
Replies: 8
Views: 3631

Ken,

I have nearly full tree trunks as floor joists in the c.1815 portion of my farmhouse. The top and bottom were dressed/hewn, but the sides are still natural edge (but de-barked). The c.1870 addition of my house has identical construction, but the joists are all milled.

Hope this helps.