Search found 1277 matches

by sooth
Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:21 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Buying old 'new' replacement trim
Replies: 16
Views: 16187

Re: Buying old 'new' replacement trim

A lot of Craftsman style casings (similar to mine) also don't use mitres. The exception is the top crown mouldings on the doors, but they are not too difficult to cut, and don't require extreme accuracy. https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-7cieZIaLz8M/T1JaNfM-YQI/AAAAAAAAASQ/IDjtAKuo-50/s800/P2220253...
by sooth
Tue Nov 27, 2012 6:36 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Doorway Trim - Not enough clearance
Replies: 17
Views: 14962

Re: Doorway Trim - Not enough clearance

Ah crap. That's not what I was picturing at all. This is a design problem. When cabinets like this are installed, you always have to think about clearances for casings and even window stools in some cases. USUALLY, the cabinet has a "filler" on the end touching the wall. A standard filler is usually...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:53 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Wall Construction Revealed
Replies: 11
Views: 7836

Re: Wall Construction Revealed

Mine seems pretty sturdy, too, considering that the outside walls only have studs every 2 ft. I've currently got: Outside-In: - Aluminum siding - Thin fiber "wedge shaped" insulation under the aluminum - Furring strips - Brick asphalt/shingle siding! What fun! - Fiber insulation - More furring strip...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 7:04 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Tiny doors?
Replies: 4
Views: 3030

Re: Tiny doors?

As far as I know, all the door manufacturers can make your doors to a custom size for an extra charge. I was quoted about 12$ extra to have a 5 panel interior door made 78" tall instead of 80". Additionally, any cabinetmaker can make you a very sturdy solid wood door for usually a very decent price,...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 6:54 pm
Forum: Post-1900 Houses Forum
Topic: Faux quartersawn oak?
Replies: 11
Views: 9023

Re: Faux quartersawn oak?

Grain-painted woodwork was quite popular around the 1900s. The most spectacular grain-painted quarter-sawn oak I've ever seen was at a church in Finch, Ontario: This entire wall was a paneled division between the main church and the chapel, and it must have been over 16 feet high. The entire thing w...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:47 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Buying old 'new' replacement trim
Replies: 16
Views: 16187

Re: Buying old 'new' replacement trim

I know of only a few people who have been lucky enough to salvage enough old trim to reuse/replace/match the trim in their house. They got it from multiple sources, mostly old farm houses that were being torn down or gutted. This is their blog. You'll have to go back almost a year to view some of th...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:38 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: old writer's desk?
Replies: 3
Views: 2108

Re: old writer's desk?

It appears to be a reproduction, but it's very hard to tell. In the photos, the decorations almost look like plastic. Are they wood? How are the drawers constructed? What does the back look like?
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 5:34 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Cast Iron pipe and strange clay thingy --what is it?
Replies: 25
Views: 12055

Re: Cast Iron pipe and strange clay thingy --what is it?

Wow, I had no idea Vicks went back to the middle ages! Just kidding. Here in Cornwall, we had a similar plant (just down the street from my house) that used to make "No-Corrode" piping. Many homes in Cornwall have it, and for any homeowner unlucky enough to still have it, it's a source of problems. ...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:29 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Stripping a door
Replies: 11
Views: 10145

Re: Stripping a door

Definitely an appliqué and be sure to work around it carefully, so as not to break any pieces of it off. I would suggest a generic brand of paint and varnish remover, but that's simply because that's the method I've always used to strip antiques, and it works very well for me. Be warned, this is a m...
by sooth
Mon Nov 26, 2012 4:13 pm
Forum: General Discussions Forum
Topic: Cleaning and restoring dirty wood trim.
Replies: 9
Views: 35767

Re: Cleaning and restoring dirty wood trim.

To me, that looks old and gorgeous. I would simply go over any small nicks and scratches with a tiny bit of matching stain, and leave it exactly as-is. If you do want to clean it, there are several methods and products you could try. You could use vinegar and a rag (and a lot of elbow grease), you c...