Where do you BUY Lime Putty In the US?

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My4t2de
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Location: NW of Sundine, WSW of BrantR&boots, S of Prairiebox and N of Jokergirl

Where do you BUY Lime Putty In the US?

Post by My4t2de »

I have just read 197 pages, blogs and websites talking about all the things you can do with it, but everyone failed to list where they got it.

jellybar
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:10 am
Location: Western Mass

Post by jellybar »

USHeritage.com sells it. Im not sure if their pricing is competitive or not, but surely it's not cheap to ship such heavy goods. I haven't tried to source it out locally, but any masonry dealer should have the ingredients to make your own.

http://www.usheritage.com/


HTH,
Jill

My4t2de
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Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2006 4:49 pm
Location: NW of Sundine, WSW of BrantR&boots, S of Prairiebox and N of Jokergirl

Post by My4t2de »

Thanks for the link, that does look costly though. Surely they can't be the only place? :?

None of the masons here have ever heard of lime putty, plaster or mortar!

No building supply place around here has a clue what we're talking about.

It's so frustrating, even the local preservation board here is clueless, everyone around here has been repairing with drywall compound! :shock:

jellybar
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:10 am
Location: Western Mass

Post by jellybar »

Im pretty sure Lime putty is just common hydrated lime w/ H2O added to form a thick goo from my Googling on the subject. Ive never seen nor made the stuff though, so hopefully someone will correct me if Im wrong on it.

--------------------------------
google uk.diy newsgroups wrote:Lime is usually used as 3:1 mix by volume of sand to lime putty. (Lime
putty is lime mixed with water to a paste and stored.) It can also be
used straight from the bag as a 3:1 mix.
That's from a newsgroup thread in 'uk.d-i-y'.Scroll about quarter of the way down the conversation in the link below:

http://groups.google.com/group/uk.d-i-y ... 3f068724e5

--------------------------------
mc2-ice.com website wrote:The terms hydrated lime and lime putty mean the same thing since lime putty is simply wet hydrated lime (you added some water to it and stirred it up) whereas in hydrated lime all of the water molecules are stoichiometrically bonded to the calcium and magnesium in the lime and the lime remains a dry powder. Lime putty is just wet hydrated lime.

Also you can read the full passage from the site here:
http://www.mc2-ice.com/popular_conversi ... mortar.htm


HTH
Jill
Last edited by jellybar on Sat Oct 28, 2006 5:57 pm, edited 4 times in total.

jellybar
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:10 am
Location: Western Mass

Post by jellybar »

My4t2de wrote:Thanks for the link, that does look costly though. Surely they can't be the only place? :?
I haven't shopped around for pricing on any of the lime products, Im not quite that far along yet. Sorry. But Im 85% sure you can DIY and make your own. ( from my Google travels and a few frendly emailing Brits) Just gotta get the raw ingredents.

The Brits are far more into the DIY masonry discussions because many of their homes do have historical brickwork , so they seem to be much more savvy and knowledgeable about it than many of the masonry contractors in the US. (At least the ones I have chatted with)
My4t2de wrote: No building supply place around here has a clue what we're talking about.
I think many of the terms may be British or just turn of the century names that are long forgotten. Kinda scary, huh? And these are the very same folks you are going to hire to "save" your historical brickwork, no less. :shock:
My4t2de wrote: It's so frustrating, even the local preservation board here is clueless, everyone around here has been repairing with drywall compound! :shock:
Im with ya there. Welcome to the club. I feel like a pariah when I call into the masonry supply to ask questions. They make me feel like Im retarded. :evil:

Jill
Last edited by jellybar on Sat Oct 28, 2006 10:29 pm, edited 3 times in total.

My4t2de
Posts: 846
Joined: Sat Oct 28, 2006 4:49 pm
Location: NW of Sundine, WSW of BrantR&boots, S of Prairiebox and N of Jokergirl

Post by My4t2de »

Yes, that's basically what it is, buy now I'm an expert on the composition :P , but to buy the right kind of lime to mix with the water is the part I'm finding impossible!

jellybar
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:10 am
Location: Western Mass

Post by jellybar »

My4t2de wrote:Yes, that's basically what it is, buy now I'm an expert on the composition :P , but to buy the right kind of lime to mix with the water is the part I'm finding impossible!
Just found this article and quote, it's pretty interesting on lime putty vs. hydrated lime:
restoration trades.com wrote:The only difference between hydrated lime and lime putty is the amount of water that has been added to them.

http://www.restorationtrades.com/articles/art30.shtml

------------------------

"Niagara Mature Lime Putty" is a brand name for lime putty mqade by Graymont ( http://www.graymont.com) that is available, although I don't know who would carry it locally. In a perfect consumer driven world though, you should be able to special order it through a local masonry supply place if it's no where else.

------------------------

This article has a brief mention on how to DIY your own lime putty from the 'Quicklime' product (the non-hydrated variety of lime)
lowimpact.org website wrote:quicklime being slaked in an old bath: the lime must be added to the water and not the other way round, as it could cause an explosion. The ratio of water:lime is 3:1. To ensure that all the lime is slaked, the mixture is raked continuously for 10 minutes. There is a violent reaction, and heat and steam is given off. When it is cool, the ‘lime putty’ can be stored in plastic buckets indefinitely as long as there is a layer of water on top
here's the full page:
http://www.lowimpact.org/factsheet_lime.htm


Don't burn your eyebrows off! :shock: :wink:

Jill

Greg
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Post by Greg »

This is a good link for basic info on Lime and lime putty.
http://www.spab.org.uk/publications_Q&A_lime.html

Master of Plaster is supplier in NY
http://www.masterofplaster.com/

This is a blog entry for a lime recipe
http://swansroad.blogspot.com/2006/05/m ... -lime.html

This thread, here on The Old House Web, has HB's lime mortor recipe.
http://www.oldhouseweb.com/newBB/viewto ... ime+mortor

Period Property UK has many threads on lime & lime putty. It is hard to sift through everything to get good information that applies here in The States, but there is a lot there.
http://www.periodproperty.co.uk/cgi-bin ... /forum2.pl

jellybar
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 9:10 am
Location: Western Mass

Post by jellybar »

Good links, thanks Greg.


@My4t2de

After rooting around the Graymont website, it seems that they sell all the products you'd need concerning lime putty. You can either buy the quicklime (non-hydrated lime) and DIY to slake your own lime putty, or you can pick up Niagra brand pre-made lime putty, or you can also get the raw hydrated lime in bags in various grades and just custom mix your own mortar using any of the mortar recipes out there too.

I haven't phoned my local masonry supply to see if they stock, or can special order from Graymont, but surely someone in your neck of the woods could place an order with them if they only sell bizness to bizness.

here's their product line:
http://www.graymont.com/products.shtml

Jill

leonardk
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Joined: Wed Sep 27, 2006 11:57 am

Post by leonardk »

Send an email to Todd File at Graymont (tfile@graymont.com) and ask where you can get 3 gallon pails of lime putty locally. He gave me a store in Novi, MI which is about an hour from me.

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