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re keying old plaster

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re keying old plaster

Postby catya » Tue Apr 27, 2004 12:54 pm

Has anyone heard of the technique for fixing broken plaster keyes, which is to drill holes at regular intervals and insert some kind of stuff which would fill in behind the wall to form new keys attaching plaster to lath.

I heard someone mention this yrs ago but dont remember any of the details. Sort of an alternative to plaster washers for firming up loose plaster.
catya
 

Postby Guest » Tue Apr 27, 2004 6:37 pm

They do make something called a Plaster Washer (aka Plaster Ring or Ceiling Button). It is a wide, flat, perforated washer. You use drywall screws with them. The screw goes through the center of the washer and into the lathe and the washer hold the plaster up. After you have put as many in as you need you then skim coat over the washers. I've used them with great success. Another thing I did was to push the plaster back against the lathe and then work in the attic from the top with some construction adhesive to sort of re-create the keys. It seems to be holding up well. I also saw on an old episode of THO where some one used some type of adhesive to reattach the plaster. It was a similar method to what you describe. I don't recall what they used.

Greg
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Postby Chris » Tue Apr 27, 2004 9:37 pm

Yeah, I've heard about that. Haven't done it yet though. Here's a link that might help:

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow ... 50,00.html
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Postby BobG » Tue Apr 27, 2004 9:40 pm

OHJ has a method similar, but instead of just using plaster washers, here's what you do:

1. secure the good plaster
2. drill several small holes in the questionable (sagging) areas
3. use a shop vac to evacuate the areas of dust and debris
4. insert construction adhesive into the holes
5. brace the sagging area until the adhesive sets.

notes:

If the area is only sagging a fraction of an inch or so, this method should work. (I've not tried it yet, but will as soon as I finish the walls)

You will want to put something such as wax paper between the board you use to brace the repair area and the ceiling. This will keep the construction adhesive from attaching the brace board to the ceiling, causing further damage when you remove the brace.
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Postby catya » Tue Apr 27, 2004 10:07 pm

thanks, is there any particular brand or product name I should look for, I've never heard of "construction adhesive." I've decided I'm tired of plaster washers, can never get them to lie flat so then it takes forever to futz around w/ plaster trying to conceal them.
catya
 

Re: re keying old plaster

Postby oldhouse » Tue Apr 27, 2004 11:03 pm

catya wrote:Has anyone heard of the technique for fixing broken plaster keyes, which is to drill holes at regular intervals and insert some kind of stuff which would fill in behind the wall to form new keys attaching plaster to lath.


Plaster washers are great ... but I never seem to have a stash of them handy when I need them, and nobody in our neck of the woods carries them (or, at least, nobody I know of).

So I use what is at hand.

Typically in the past when I've need plaster washers, I've grabbed a piece of aluminum roof flashing and then cut pieces of it into inch or inch-and-a-half circles -- then attached it to the wall using drywall screws to re-key plaster. This works fine.

Currently we Holmeses are reworking the kitchen in our 1878 Victorian house. The other day I needed plaster washers. As is always the case, I didn't have any.

This time, Deb took one of the stiff clear plastic semi-throwaway freezer containers - one of the ones made by Glad, or Tupperware, or similar companies - and cut up a bunch of round pieces. And then I used them as plaster washers. They worked great ... pulled the plaster in nice and snug to the wall ... and drywall mud sticks nicely to their surface.

So there -- for anyone to poke holes at, if they wish -- I've given away one of my "tricks of the trade."

Ken at The Old House Web
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Postby BobG » Wed Apr 28, 2004 1:15 am

I use a 15/16" spade bit and HAND countersink holes just through the finish coat.. The reason I do it by hand became obvious the first time I tried to speed up the process by actually using a drill ... yup ... I made a mess of that section ... fortunately it was a wall and not a ceiling.

I don't have "plaster washers" either, so I went to home depot and got some 'button cap' roofing felt nails. removed the plastic cap and voila' ... a plaster washer. attached to 1 1/2" or 2" drywall screws, they work pretty good. And, being countersunk, They smooth over quite well.
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Postby Guest » Wed Apr 28, 2004 3:43 am

I like the counter sink idea. Plaster washers were impossible to find locally. No one had ever heard of them. If anyone else has this problem I found them on-line at Kilian Hardware.

http://www.kilianhardware.com/ceilbutplasw.html

As for construction adhesive I bought the stuff in a tube to use with a caulking gun. Any hardware store has it.

Greg
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Plaster re-keying

Postby S&K » Sun May 02, 2004 10:10 pm

Several years ago TOH had a session (in Boston) where artisan resolidified the Plaster. He has a website, and sells several "purpose" made adhesives and wetting agents for just this occassion. I've always been curious whether the formulation was any different than what you can get more readily at the hardware store - the stuff he sells was at quite a premium price.
S&K
 

Postby angharad » Fri May 14, 2004 11:39 am

i'm a novice so apologies! i'm trying to save the plaster in my 1890's home and i plan to use plaster washers. should i drill a hole and insert a wall anchor before putting in the screw and washer? my plaster is set onto the lathe walls and is relatively good apart from minimal areas of water damage and some cracks.
angharad
 

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