Sandblasting Paint off of Wood?

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Sandblasting Paint off of Wood?

Postby leowis1 on Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:53 am

Hello All,

I'm just coming down from the rush of using the sand blaster on a stone wall. Post cleanup, I noticed that I sprayed the sandblaster on the edge of the porch floor. It took the paint off and exposed the natural wood. Now I'm asking myself if I can sandblast the wood siding, dental molding, and trim around the house!? Granted, the sand blaster I used on the stone was way too powerful. I would need a smaller one if I tried this. But what are the consequences of sandblasting wood?

I know I could ruin some detail work, but what about the grains in the wood? Can this still be painted? :?

Leo
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Postby lrkrgrrl on Mon Mar 13, 2006 11:08 am

Not recommended, neighbor. For one thing, it's the worst possible technique for removing lead paints, as it spreads fine dust everywhere. Two, it will damage your materials beyond repair, as well as increasing the risks of moisture damage.
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Postby Don M on Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:45 pm

I agree with Lrkrgrrl, it is easy to use but you won't be plased with the result. Don
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Postby Dave on Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:30 pm

The blaster tends to blast out the pulp wood between the annual rings while leaving the annual rings resulting in a ridged effect. This increases the exposed surface area of the wood, and leaves more crannies to collect moisture. It's quick and it's tempting, but best not done. If you use it on brick, you stand to blast off the tough outer fired skin leaving the soft inner brick exposed.
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Postby leowis1 on Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:44 pm

Hmmm..... I blasted big stone rocks. Did I do anything bad to them? Is there a sealant I could spray on the rocks if I did?

Sitting here for hours stewing about how I'm going to tackle this job, I think I'm going to use chemicals. I have two babies now and very little time. I think I'll get the pasty stuff, apply it to 30min or 1hr sections at a time and blast it off with a power washer. What's ever left over I'll either reapply the chemicals or burn and sand. This way I can run back into the house and help my wife while the chemicals are working. :?

I have a wimpy power washer, 1500 PSI. That's can't do much damage.
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Postby Don M on Mon Mar 13, 2006 5:14 pm

Be careful where the water & stripped paint goes. The stripper will strip paint from other surfaces & kill any grass or bushes it gets on. The stripped paint may have lead in it and that will contaminate anything it touches---in urban neighborhoods with old wood sided houses (Boston) they recommend removing 6 inches of topsoil, replacing it with fresh just to get rid of the worst of the lead in the soil (lead paint chips from the house siding). Don
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Postby moonshadow317 on Mon Mar 13, 2006 8:17 pm

Blasting the siding with all that water will not only ruin the siding but will also enter all the areas in between the clapboards to soak the sheathing, insulation and whatever underneath. We unknowingly hosed the side of our house while preping it to paint in 2001 and ruined a wall, ceiling and wooden floor and that was just a regular garden hose. :(

Karen
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Postby leowis1 on Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:39 pm

I just performed a lead paint tester on the outside of my house. It came up negative! That's good...I think. What if there's non-lead paint over lead paint; will this tester thing still work?
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Postby Andy in NH on Mon Mar 13, 2006 10:26 pm

Be carefull of the lead paint testers! Take a sharp edged tool and make an X in the paint, then try to remove/expose the different layers first, THEN try your tester on each layer. Lead paint will not react with the swab type testers if there is another coating over it. This is one reason why the pro's use an x-ray device to test for the presence of lead.

Beyond that, I agree with the others, no blasting. Water will do more harm then good to the woodwork and sandblasting will just plain destroy it (and your neighborhood). Not appropriate tools for paint removal. Low(temps) and slow is pretty much how it goes. If you end up using the chemical means, make sure you set up a plastic "catch basin" under each section of wall so you can dispose of everything properly (and keep the kiddies safe too).
Big Barn, Little Barn, Saltbox, Cape, 2 storey Farmhouse - and a shed to boot! 237' end to end. This could take a while.....
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Re: Sandblasting Paint off of Wood?

Postby aethelredchrist on Mon Sep 04, 2017 2:04 am

Oh that's sad that you were trying to do something good but you did not get the required result. But anyways now I think you should take professional help instead of doing more experiments.
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