Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

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lupinfarm
Posts: 934
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by lupinfarm »

Had another contractor in today to look at my kitchen floor and structure. He said he would have to remove all the old
floor joists which include hand sawed beams and victorian 2x6 dimensional lumber and replace it all with modern 2x8 or 2x10
joists 12 or maybe 16 inches on center in order to level the floor and provide the proper support as my joists are about 19 inches on center. I had a contractor tell me yesterday that he wouldnt remove the original joists but would sister new 2x8s or
2x10s to the existing dimensional lumber and shim the top of the hand sawed tree trunk beams to provide additional support
and level the floor. Any one had this problem on OHW and what did you do, how successful was it? :?:
putting the 18 back in my 1872 Victorian farmhouse.

Renaissance Restorations
Posts: 97
Joined: Fri Aug 13, 2004 11:56 pm
Location: Massachusetts
Contact:

Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by Renaissance Restorations »

Sistering new joist to the old beams/joists is a better way to go. I've done this on several structural repair jobs, and the end work is way above code in terms of strength.

JoeF
Renaissance Restorations LLC
35 Grove Ave
Leominster, MA 01453

http://www.renaissancerestorations.com

lupinfarm
Posts: 934
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by lupinfarm »

Hi Joef....Yes I think that would be within my comfort zone. I am really leery about removing old structure ( especially if it
is in good shape). I had a contractor in today and he says I may have to take every thing out and for the span ( if i didnt want
to have more footings done ) go with LVLs or LSLs as the span in one direction is 17feet and the other 20feet and remove
the stairs and restructure underneath. This talk has got me scared I can tell you. Now we would be into the $20,000 plus
area. I dont know if I am being "sold" here. Well the project will have to wait for the spring as it is really cold here now,-24c.
Cant wait to get at it and rip all that old stuff up and find out what is really going on. To add to the list of problems someone
in the past put a large window in one end of the kitchen removing two smaller windows and they may have been remiss in
providing enough structure. They also forgot that they had to re -sheath, install house wrap. So the room is really cold.
PO`s who needs them. Peeling back the layers of time can be frightening. :)
putting the 18 back in my 1872 Victorian farmhouse.

KristenS
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Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 12:38 pm
Location: Northern NJ
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Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by KristenS »

I really don't trust anyone who suggests that replacing an existing structure is the best idea. If that contractor broke his finger, would he cut it off and get a prosthetic?!

Ok, so that's not *exactly* the same situation. :wink: But I think you get my drift!
Image
c. 1907 Shingle Victorian/Craftsman
House history still being researched!

mfglickman
Posts: 138
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:48 am

Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by mfglickman »

I've heard of sistering joists. In my basement/crawlspace there are sistered joists and a couple of places where someone added support but no evidence that anything was ever removed.

I had some very dippy, vertigo-inducing wide chestnut planks on my second floor and a carpenter pulled them up and replaced the 'scrap wood' underneath them as it was deteriorated, then replaced the board (using the original square nails) and that made a world of difference for a small price. Perhaps a bit of that could be done along with whatever structural shoring up needs to happen?

Mary
Image
"The Revolutionary Cottage" ca. 1758 in NW CT

wletson
Posts: 2428
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 2:22 pm
Location: Ayr, Ontario

Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by wletson »

Sistering makes the most sense to me too. A little less deconstruction involved too. Maybe the contractor who is pushing to remove them has a client looking for hand hewn beams?
Image1883 Schoolhouse, rural Ontario, Canada
warren

lupinfarm
Posts: 934
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2010 8:55 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Re: Had another contractor in...even more confused Help!

Post by lupinfarm »

Hi all I agree removing all the old structure is a bit like "radical surgery"
Risky and success cannot be guaranteed. I am not comfortable tinker
Ing with structure. All my instincts say " don't do it" . So I am going
With the sistering option. I did wonder about the contractor who
Asked me what I was going to do with the lovely old beams. They are
All in good shape, no moisture damage and I love looking at them.
Funny what you get all" Mushy " over. I feel more like a custodian
Than an owner.
putting the 18 back in my 1872 Victorian farmhouse.

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